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I am trying to make more use of interfaces in my projects. A lot of the examples I have looked at online are tivial (but helpful). Please have a look at the code below:

Public Class Animal
    Implements Eatable
    Public Overridable Sub Eat() Implements Eatable.Eat
        MsgBox("Animal Eat no arguement")
    End Sub
Public Overridable Overloads Sub Eat(ByVal food As String) Implements Eatable.Eat
    MsgBox("Animal Eat food arguement")
End Sub
End Class

Public Class Horse
    Inherits Animal
    Implements Eatable
    Public Overrides Sub Eat()
        MsgBox("Horse Eat no arguement")
    End Sub
    Public Overloads Sub Eat(ByVal food As String)
        MsgBox("Horse Eat food arguement")
    End Sub
End Class

Public Interface Eatable
    Sub Eat()
    Sub Eat(ByVal localEat As String)
End Interface

Public Class Form1

    Private Sub Form2_Load(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Me.Load
        TestFunction(1)
    End Sub

    Public Sub TestFunction(ByVal intTest As Integer)
        Dim e1 As Eatable
        If intTest = 1 Then
            e1 = New Horse
        Else
            e1 = New Animal
        End If
        'Functionality specific to e1 from here
    End Sub
End Class

I read somewhere that it is poor practice to use polymorphism in the way I have done in TestFunction i.e. instantiating e1 as a horse or animal depending on the value of intTest. If this is the case then can someone recommend a design pattern?

share|improve this question
    
The problem is e1 is an Eatable object, and when you use it to create a Horse, the Eat(byval food as string) won't be available. –  LarsTech Jul 26 '12 at 17:03
    
@LarsTech, I have removed this bug. This was not what I was getting at. Is it right to use the interface as I have done in TestFunction i.e. deciding at runtime what object to create an instance of? –  w0051977 Jul 26 '12 at 17:16
    
It seems fine. Hard to answer since the question doesn't address a specific problem. Your TestFunction basically says "I only want to deal with an eatable object" and you did that. –  LarsTech Jul 26 '12 at 17:21
    
@Lartech, that was the answer I was hoping for. If you answer the question then I will mark it. –  w0051977 Jul 26 '12 at 17:24
1  
This is almost a Factory Method Deseign pattern. At runtime you pass an Animal in the factory and it returns an specific instance (in your case An Horse or an Animal). I recommend you take a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern for more detailed informations. –  Minus Jul 26 '12 at 17:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is nothing fundamentally wrong with this code (other than your interface should start with a capital "I"):

Dim e1 As Eatable
If intTest = 1 Then
  e1 = New Horse
Else
  e1 = New Animal
End If

as long as your expectations are to only have to deal with an IEatable object.

If you end up needing to determine "what" kind of animal you have, something like this:

If TypeOf e1 Is Horse Then
  MessageBox.Show("Yeah, you're a horse")
Else
  MessageBox.Show("You are not a horse")
End If

then you have ended up designing something wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, are you saying it is poor design to use the 'TypeOf' operator. –  w0051977 Jul 26 '12 at 17:43
    
@w0051977 TypeOf has its uses, but if you need to use it to differentiate what your IEatable object is, then yes, your interface isn't designed correctly. When you are passing your IEatable object around in your code, you shouldn't need to know or care if it's a Horse or a Cow. –  LarsTech Jul 26 '12 at 17:48

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