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In a tutorial on monads, in the section A more complex side effect: Random Numbers, the author provides the signature of the random function like so:

random :: StdGen -> (a,StdGen)

but then goes on to say that:

So a function that is conceptually a randomised function a → b can be written as a function
a -> StdGen -> (b,StdGen)
where StdGen is the type of the seed.

Where does the extra a in the begining of the signature come from? Why is the type of that not simply StdGen -> (a, StdGen) as before???

Thanks

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Those are two different functions. One takes a StdGen and returns a result of that random generator along with the new state. He then says, "so if we have a function that mutates an a randomly, you'd get..." and then the second signature. – GManNickG Jul 26 '12 at 17:01
    
Oh, ok got it! That random mutating explanation makes it clear. Thanks. – drozzy Jul 26 '12 at 17:12
    
@GManNickG Could you put this in an answer so I can accept it? – drozzy Jul 31 '12 at 12:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not the same because those are two different functions he's describing. :)

The first one takes a StdGen and returns a result of that random generator along with the new state.

He then says, "so if we have a function that mutates an a randomly (into b), you'd get..." and then the second signature.

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I assume it means a is the argument in a -> b and the random b is StdGen -> (b, StdGen). StdGen -> (a, StdGen) would just give you a random a.

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