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I need to send an XML message to a web service for my WP7 app, but I have no experience doing that.

This is the format in which the web service needs me to send the XML:

<pfpMessage version='1.5'>
 <header>
    <source>
      <component type="pfsvc" role="master">
        <host ip="" hostname="" serverId=""/>
      </component>
    </source>
  </header>
  <request request-id='1288730909' async='0' response-url='' language='en'>
    <phoneAppValidateDeviceTokenRequest >
      <phoneAppContext >
        <guid>...</guid>
        <deviceToken >...</deviceToken>
        <version >1.0.0</version>
      </phoneAppContext>
      <validationResult >yes</validationResult>
    </phoneAppValidateDeviceTokenRequest>
  </request>
</pfpMessage>

And this is a small section of the code I have written:

    XDocument doc = new XDocument();

    // start message
    XElement root = doc.Element("pfpMessage");
    root.SetAttributeValue("version", 1.5);
    doc.Add(root);

    // message header
    XElement header = doc.Element("header");
    root.Add(header);
    XElement source = doc.Element("source");
    header.Add(source);
    XElement component = doc.Element("component");
    component.SetAttributeValue("type", "pfsdk");
    source.Add(component);
    XElement element = doc.Element("host");
    element.SetAttributeValue("ip", pfAuthParams.IpAddress);
    element.SetAttributeValue("hostname", pfAuthParams.Hostname);
    component.Add(element);

Part of the problem is that the SetAttributeValue function keeps throwing an exception even though it looks exactly the same as the MSDN example.

Is this the right way to build an XML message that matches the format?

EDIT: This causes an InvalidOperationException:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
            new XElement("pfpMessage",
                new XAttribute("version", 1.5),
                new XElement("header",
                    new XElement("source",
                        new XElement("component",
                            new XAttribute("type", "pfsdk"),
                            new XElement("host",
                                new XAttribute("ip", pfAuthParams.IpAddress),
                                new XAttribute("hostname", pfAuthParams.Hostname)
                            )
                        )
                    )
                )
            ),
            new XElement("request",
                new XAttribute("request-id", y),
                new XAttribute("async", 0),
                new XAttribute("response-url", ""),
                new XAttribute("language", "en"),
                new XElement("phoneAppValidateDeviceTokenRequest",
                    new XElement("phoneAppValidateContext"),
                    new XElement("guid", (Application.Current as App).SharedGUID),
                    new XElement("deviceToken", (Application.Current as App).SharedURI)
                    ),
                    new XElement("version", "1.0.0")
                )                   
        );
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here:

XElement root = doc.Element("pfpMessage");
root.SetAttributeValue("version", 1.5);

... you're assuming that the element already exists. The Element method finds an element in the container you call it on. You've only just created the document, so it's empty. You need to create a new element:

XElement root = new XElement("pfpMessage");

Likewise everywhere else.

Here's a clearer way of doing it:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XElement("pfpMessage",
        new XAttribute("version", 1.5),
        new XElement("header",
            new XElement("source",
                new XElement("component",
                    new XAttribute("type", "pfsdk"),
                    new XElement("host",
                        new XAttribute("ip", pfAuthParams.IpAddress),
                        new XAttribute("hostname", pfAuthParams.Hostname)
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
);

(Obviously you can collapse the brackets at the end if you want.)

This is a more declarative way of constructing the document - it's closer to the spirit of LINQ to XML. Of course you can manually create each element separately and attach it to the parent, but it's more long-winded.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! Would you mind glancing at my edit? I'm getting an InvalidOperationException and can't figure it out. –  SirJames Jul 26 '12 at 20:03
    
@SirJames: Always include the full details of the exception when you mention one in a post. Ideally the full stack trace, but at least the message. –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '12 at 20:04
    
@SirJames: (In this case I can work it out, but it would have been simpler if you'd posted the message.) You're providing two top-level elements (pfpMessage and request). An XML document can only have one root element. You should be constructing the request element at the same level as the header element. –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '12 at 20:05
    
Sorry about that. I guess it was a simple mistake. Close parenthesis in the wrong place. Thanks. –  SirJames Jul 26 '12 at 20:10

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