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The Puppetlabs docs state that in order for one class to require another class you should use the relationship chaining syntax and declare both classes in your outer nodes.

I have a repo class which creates the yum repo definition that many packages in each modole depend on. In each module I have a Class['repo'] -> Class['modulename'] statement and both classes are declared in the node. However, when puppet runs it doesn't always execute the repo class before the module class as expected. Why not? Example below (puppet 2.6.16):

EDIT: It appears there are 3 basic solutions to this problem.

  1. Replace the class dependencies with resources dependencies using before/require metaparameters (as shown in turingmachine's answer).
  2. Remove exterior class dependencies and explicitly state dependencies between inner classes.
  3. Use anchor type as provided by Puppetlabs in the stdlib module to contain a class allowing the depending class to create a reference to the external class using the chaining syntax.

So which of these approaches is best, considering Puppet v3 and the desire to keep refactoring to a minimum going forward'?

Manifest puppettest.pp:

class { 'repo': }
class { 'maradns': }

class repo {
  class { 'repo::custom': }
}

class repo::custom {
  yumrepo {'custom':
    enabled  => 1,
    gpgcheck => 0,
    descr    => "Local respository - ${::architecture}",
    baseurl  => 'http://repo.nike.local/CentOS/\$releasever/\$basearch';
  }
}

class maradns {
  Class['repo'] -> Class['maradns::install']
  Class['maradns::install'] -> Class['maradns::config']
  Class['maradns::config'] ~> Class['maradns::service']
  class { 'maradns::install': }
  class { 'maradns::config':  }
  class { 'maradns::service': }
}

class maradns::install {
  package { 'maradns':
    ensure  => present,
  }
}

class maradns::config {
  file { 'mararc':
    ensure  => present,
    path    => '/etc/mararc',
    mode    => '0644',
    owner   => root,
    group   => root,
  }
}

class maradns::service {
  service { 'maradns':
    ensure     => running,
    enable     => true,
    hasrestart => true,
  }
}

Output:

puppet apply puppettest.pp    
err: /Stage[main]/Maradns::Install/Package[maradns]/ensure: change from absent to present failed: Execution of '/usr/bin/yum -d 0 -e 0 -y install maradns' returned 1: Error: Nothing to do

notice: /Stage[main]/Maradns::Config/File[mararc]: Dependency Package[maradns] has failures: true
warning: /Stage[main]/Maradns::Config/File[mararc]: Skipping because of failed dependencies
notice: /Stage[main]/Maradns::Service/Service[maradns]: Dependency Package[maradns] has failures: true
warning: /Stage[main]/Maradns::Service/Service[maradns]: Skipping because of failed dependencies
notice: /Stage[main]/Repo::Custom/Yumrepo[custom]/descr: descr changed '' to 'Local respository - x86_64'
notice: /Stage[main]/Repo::Custom/Yumrepo[custom]/baseurl: baseurl changed '' to 'http://repo.tamazaki.com/CentOS/\$releasever/\$basearch'
notice: /Stage[main]/Repo::Custom/Yumrepo[custom]/enabled: enabled changed '' to '1'
notice: /Stage[main]/Repo::Custom/Yumrepo[custom]/gpgcheck: gpgcheck changed '' to '0'
notice: Finished catalog run in 2.15 seconds
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migrated from serverfault.com Jul 26 '12 at 17:51

This question came from our site for professional system and network administrators.

    
As per your flag, @Michelle, I've removed the bounty comment. Unfortunately it cannot be changed. However, the bountied question gets attention even without the notice. –  ThiefMaster Jul 27 '12 at 10:41
    
I like your thinking. I think it's solved in 3.2.* or not? –  Jimmy Kane Nov 19 '13 at 22:24
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4 Answers 4

From the puppetlabs stdlib documentation

In Puppet 2.6, when a class declares another class, the resources in the interior class are not contained by the exterior class. This interacts badly with the pattern of composing complex modules from smaller classes, as it makes it impossible for end users to specify order relationships between the exterior class and other modules.

The anchor type lets you work around this. By sandwiching any interior classes between two no-op resources that are contained by the exterior class, you can ensure that all resources in the module are contained.

Based on the posted manifest, an example would be:

Manifest puppettest.pp:

class { 'repo': }
class { 'maradns': }

class repo {
  anchor { 'repo::begin': } ->
  class { 'repo::custom': } ->
  anchor { 'repo::end': }
}

class repo::custom {
  yumrepo {'custom':
    enabled  => 1,
    gpgcheck => 0,
    descr    => "Local respository - ${::architecture}",
    baseurl  => 'http://repo.nike.local/CentOS/\$releasever/\$basearch';
  }
}

class maradns {
  Class['repo'] -> Class['maradns::install']
  Class['maradns::install'] -> Class['maradns::config']
  Class['maradns::config'] ~> Class['maradns::service']
  class { 'maradns::install': }
  class { 'maradns::config':  }
  class { 'maradns::service': }
}

class maradns::install {
  package { 'maradns':
    ensure  => present,
  }
}

class maradns::config {
  file { 'mararc':
    ensure  => present,
    path    => '/etc/mararc',
    mode    => '0644',
    owner   => root,
    group   => root,
  }
}

class maradns::service {
  service { 'maradns':
    ensure     => running,
    enable     => true,
    hasrestart => true,
  }
}
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This answer is outdated? I don't see anything like this in the docs plus it works with >3.2. @michelle can you verify? –  Jimmy Kane Nov 19 '13 at 22:49
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A good starting point for debugging dependency issues is to instruct puppet to generate a dependency graph.

puppet --graph --noop manifest.pp
dot -Tpng /var/lib/puppet/state/graphs/relationships.dot -o relationships.png

By doing this you would see that the class repo:custom has no dependency information at all.

maradns::install sure has a dependency on the repo class but not on the repo::custom class, because repo::custom has no dependency on repo.

The new class declaration syntax class {'classname':} does not set any dependencies, it behaves just like the include classname syntax.

So either you set a dependency from repo::custom to repo or you instruct the maradns::install class to directly depend on the repo:custom class.

But you will run into more trouble. A dependency on class will only make sure that this class is applied. However, there will be no dependencies set on containing resources.

I would model your case like this:

class { 'repo:custom': }
class { 'maradns': }

class repo {
}

class repo::custom {
  yumrepo {'custom':
    enabled  => 1,
    gpgcheck => 0,
    descr    => "Local respository - ${::architecture}",
    baseurl  => 'http://repo.nike.local/CentOS/\$releasever/\$basearch';
  }
}

class maradns {
  class{[
    'maradns::package',
    'maradns::config',
    'maradns::service',
  ]:}
}

class maradns::package {
  package { 'maradns':
    ensure  => present,
    require => Yumrepo['custom'],
  }
}

class maradns::config {
  file { 'marac:config':
    ensure  => present,
    mode    => '0644',
    owner   => root,
    group   => root,
  }
}

class maradns::service {
  service { 'maradns':
    ensure     => running,
    enable     => true,
    hasrestart => true,
    require => [
      Package['maradns'],
      File['mararc:config'],
    ],
  }
}
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What are you gaining by including repo::custom in repo as opposed to directly depending on repo::custom?

The pattern of declaring classes within classes like that may also be setting you up for duplicate definitions. I would focus on using repo::custom directly if possible.

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Have you considered run stages as an alternative mechanism? With a run stage, you can associate a class with a 'stage'. By default, everything occurs during the main stage. But you can set up a stage that occurs before main, and then associate that class with that 'before main' stage.

A repo is a really good candidate for a before stage. You really don't want any packages to be retrieved before your repos are set up the way you want; it can be a massive headache if you are mirroring your own package repos and lag the official repos.

The trickier scenarios are when a new puppetized server accidentally fetches a package before you've even declared you repo, and it gets it from the up-to-date public mirrors; then your repo is installed (and presumably you've remove the public mirrors now). Because this machine 'snuck in' a new artifact, dependency hell situations can easily arise where a too-new package is stopping packages you care about from being installed, because the package in question won't install because it you already have installed a too-new version and many package managers won't downgrade for you; you have to manually intervene. This situation essentially requires manual debugging to fix; just fixing your puppet rules isn't enough because the damage is done.

So just associate all repo definitions with a before phase, and be done with it. Stop tracking dependencies on your packages to repos and breath easier.

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