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if i register a broadcast receiver say in my activity like this,

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    super.onResume();

    myReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() { ... };
    IntentFilter filter = new IntentFilter("com.example.MY_ACTION");
    registerReceiver(myReceiver, filter);
}

is this receiver exported? if another app broadcasts com.example.MY_ACTION, will it be received by myReceiver?

if it is, i assume i need to use the form of registerReceiver() that accepts a string permission, and then define that permission in my manifest, giving it a high protection level (such as signature). is that correct? is there a simpler way?

thanks.

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They are exported. For ways to protect, check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/9528608/… –  Kaediil Jul 26 '12 at 18:06
    
that post is about manifest-registered receivers. i'm specifically asking about programmatically registered receivers. –  Jeffrey Blattman Jul 26 '12 at 18:59
    
Makes no difference. Once your app is running and you start the receiver anyone can send intents to you. –  Kaediil Jul 26 '12 at 19:55
1  
ignore the docs, make up your own rules, and hope you are smarter than the people who wrote them. sounds like a recipe for success. –  Jeffrey Blattman Jul 26 '12 at 20:28
1  
Ok, one last time just for you this time from the docs, right at the top of the BroadcastReceiver API: If you don't need to send broadcasts across applications, consider using this class with LocalBroadcastManager instead of the more general facilities described below. This will give you a much more efficient implementation (no cross-process communication needed) and allow you to avoid thinking about any security issues related to other applications being able to receive or send your broadcasts. Anymore questions? –  Kaediil Jul 26 '12 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From the api docs on the BroadcastReceiver API:

If you don't need to send broadcasts across applications, consider using this class with LocalBroadcastManager instead of the more general facilities described below. This will give you a much more efficient implementation (no cross-process communication needed) and allow you to avoid thinking about any security issues related to other applications being able to receive or send your broadcasts.

That way at least you can keep the receiver only inside your application.

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while this does not technically answer my question, it is a solution to the implied problem. –  Jeffrey Blattman Jul 27 '12 at 15:57
    
Not viable solution if you have to send broadcasts inside application but across process boundaries. –  Juuso Ohtonen Mar 27 at 7:43
    
@JuusoOhtonen ok, but that was not what the question was about, now was it? –  Kaediil Mar 27 at 12:58
    
@Kaediil No, it was not. However, it might be useful information to someone - at least for me it was not too clear in the beginning that local broadcasts do not work across process boundaries inside one application. It might be useful to include this information in your answer also. –  Juuso Ohtonen Mar 28 at 8:02

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