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Suppose I have this table with customer orders:

orderid Name         Email      Address_1      Address_2  City*      Zip*
---------------------------------------------------------------------------   
1       James        j@j.com    12 Foo St                 Fooville   1001
2       Alice        a@a.com    92 Bla Road               Sville     3933
3       James        j@j.c0m    12 Foo Street             Fooville   1001
4       james king   j@j.com    12             Foo St     Fooville   1001
5       Anth         ann@h.com  12 Foo Street             Stacker    2932
6       James        j@j.com    12 American St            GiftCity   0283

To save postage costs (for us), it would be ideal if we could send multiple orders going to the same person, to the same address in one print slip. For this, I need a unique record for id 1, 3, 4.

The City and Zip codes cannot be entered by the user (selected from a drop down).

Ideally, I would like the following to be returned by my query:

orderid Name    Email      Address_1      Address_2  City*      Zip*  Count
---------------------------------------------------------------------------   
1       James   j@j.com    12 Foo St                 Fooville   1001  3
2       Alice   a@a.com    92 Bla Road               Sville     3933  1
5       Anth    ann@h.com  12 Foo Street             Stacker    2932  1

Essentially, the SQL algorithm is doing a group by on similar on the following columns: Name, Email, concat(Address_1 and Address_2).

Any advice and solutions would be highly appreciated.

If there is a way to do a

GROUP BY similar((concat(name,email,address_1) 

(really sorry about the hopeless pseudo-code.. just trying to get my thoughts across).

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2  
What are the rules for 'similar'? In your example 'Foo Street' is equal to 'Foo St' which is pretty much guessing. –  Vatev Jul 26 '12 at 18:11
    
How many orders do you have on a daily basis? Could you do some manual review by a human viewer? Also, you could use an address verification service that determines the Zip+4 code, and compare on the Zip+4 code instead. –  mellamokb Jul 26 '12 at 18:12
1  
@K.H good luck with inventing SkyNet then :P –  Vatev Jul 26 '12 at 18:15
2  
I would start by getting address rectification software that converts all the addresses to a fixed format. –  Gordon Linoff Jul 26 '12 at 18:20
1  
GROUP BY SOUNDEX(CONCAT(field1,field2,...)). But you might wanna use GROUP BY SOUNDEX(name),email,city,zip,SOUNDEX(CONCAT(address_1,addres_2)). And that will still need human verification. –  Vatev Jul 26 '12 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

Well instead of discussion here is a query modify according to your requirements

select 
    orderid , 
    name , 
    email , 
    address_1 , 
    address_2 , 
    city , 
    zip , 
    count(orderid) 
from test 
group by name
order by orderid

Brings out this

    Name        Email       Address_1    Address_2  City        Zip Count
1   James       j@j.com     12 Foo St           Fooville        1001    3
2   Alice       a@a.com     92 Bla Road         Sville          3933    1
4   James King  j@j.com     12 Foo St           Fooville        1001    1
5   Anth        ann@h.com   12 Foo St           Stacker         2932    1
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