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Update: See the full answer below. The short answer is no, not directly. You can create an indirect reference using std::reference_wrapper or accomplish the same effect more generally with pointers (but without the syntactic sugar and added safety of references).

I ask because tuples make a convenient variadic storage unit in C++11. In theory it sounds reasonable for one element of a tuple to hold a reference to another element in the same tuple. (Replace "reference" with "pointer" and it works in practice.) The devil is the details of constructing such a tuple. Consider the following example:

#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
  A() : val(42) { }
  int val;
};

class B
{
public:
  B(A &a) : _a(a) { }
  int val() { return _a.val; }

private:
  A &_a;
};

int main()
{
  A a;
  B b(a);
  std::tuple<A, B> t1(a, b);
  a.val = 24;
  std::cout << std::get<0>(t1).val << "\n"; // 42
  std::cout << std::get<1>(t1).val() << "\n"; // 24

  return 0;
}

The second element in the tuple t1 references the automatic variable a instead of the first element in t1. Is there any way to construct a tuple such that one element of the tuple could hold a reference to another element in the same tuple? I'm aware that you could sort of achieve this result by creating a tuple of references, like this:

int main()
{
  A a;
  B b(a);
  std::tuple<A &, B &> t2 = std::tie(a, b);
  a.val = 24;
  std::cout << std::get<0>(t2).val << "\n"; // 24
  std::cout << std::get<1>(t2).val() << "\n"; // 24

  return 0;
}

But for my purposes that's cheating, since the second element in t2 is still ultimately referencing an object that lives outside of the tuple. The only way I can think of doing it compiles fine but may contain undefined behavior [Edited to reflect more concise example provided by Howard Hinnant]:

int main()
{
    std::tuple<A, B> t3( A(), B(std::get<0>(t3)) ); // undefined behavior?
    std::get<0>(t3).val = 24;
    std::cout << std::get<0>(t3).val << "\n";
    std::cout << std::get<1>(t3).val() << "\n"; // nasal demons?
}

Edit: Here is a minimal test program that returns with a non-zero exit status when compiled using g++ 4.7 with -O2 or higher. This suggests either undefined behavior or a bug in gcc.

#include <tuple>

class Level1
{
public:
  Level1() : _touched(false), _val(0) { }

  void touch()
  {
    _touched = true;
  }

  double feel()
  {
    if ( _touched )
    {
      _touched = false;
      _val = 42;
    }
    return _val;
  }

private:
  bool _touched;
  double _val;
};

class Level2
{
public:
  Level2(Level1 &level1) : _level1(level1) { }

  double feel()
  {
    return _level1.feel();
  }

private:
  int _spaceholder1;
  double _spaceholder2;
  Level1 &_level1;
};

class Level3
{
public:
  Level3(Level2 &level2) : _level2(level2) { }

  double feel()
  {
    return _level2.feel();
  }

private:
  Level2 &_level2;
};

int main()
{
  std::tuple<Level3, Level2, Level1> levels(
    Level3(std::get<1>(levels)),
    Level2(std::get<2>(levels)),
    Level1()
  );

  std::get<2>(levels).touch();

  return ! ( std::get<0>(levels).feel() > 0 );
}
share|improve this question
    
@Drise : From the C++11 tag wiki: "Please tag questions about C++11 with the C++ tag, along with the C++11 tag." :-] –  ildjarn Jul 27 '12 at 1:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This works for me:

#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::tuple<int&, int> t(std::get<1>(t), 2);
    std::cout << std::get<0>(t) << '\n';
    std::get<1>(t) = 3;
    std::cout << std::get<0>(t) << '\n';
}

Update

I just asked about this case on the CWG mailing list. Mike Miller assures me that this is undefined behavior per 3.8p6 bullet 2:

... The program has undefined behavior if:

...

  • the glvalue is used to access a non-static data member or call a non-static member function of the object, or

...

It would be well defined behavior if tuple was an aggregate, but because tuple has a user-declared constructor, 3.8p6b2 applies.

However this works, and avoids UB:

#include <tuple>
#include <functional>
#include <cassert>

int main()
{
    int dummy;
    std::tuple<std::reference_wrapper<int>, int> t(dummy, 2);
    std::get<0>(t) = std::get<1>(t);
    assert(std::get<0>(t) == 2);
    std::get<1>(t) = 3;
    assert(std::get<0>(t) == 3);
}
share|improve this answer
    
He already clearly indicates that it "works for him". He wants to know if it is UB or not. Your answer does not answer this query. –  Puppy Jul 26 '12 at 18:43
    
It is a more concise example of what I was trying to do, though. Thank you! –  Benjamin Kay Jul 26 '12 at 18:58
1  
I can attest with some expertise that std::get will only alias a tuple member. However I have failed to find a quote in the language half of the standard that confirms that doing so in the way I've described above is not UB. However there are some pretty smart language lawyers lurking around here and maybe they can classify this with relevant quotes. Section 12.1 is where I would expect to find this info ... –  Howard Hinnant Jul 26 '12 at 19:04
1  
I see two options: 1. Switch from reference_wrapper to pointer. 2. Accept the UB of the int& solution. I'm not aware of any implementation where the int& solution will fail you. And it is possible (an issue is being opened), that the int& solution may become well-defined in the future (no guarantee of that of course). At the end of the day, the best solution of all is to code something, and then have regular unit tests against whatever solution you have. That way even undefined behavior can be acceptable if the tests are standing by to catch assumptions gone bad. –  Howard Hinnant Jul 28 '12 at 2:02
1  
@BenVoigt: I appreciate your respect for UB. I agree that it should not be tolerated lightly. Indeed, that is why I offered an option to avoid it. That being said, this is an engineering discipline and evaluating tradeoffs is common. When considering relying on UB it is important to understand your compiler, and the hardware it is running on. It is also good to know that the C++ standard is targeting hardware that you may not care about. For example left shifting a negative is UB just in case you want to run on a UNIVAC 1100. I'm content to restrict myself to 2's compliment hardware. –  Howard Hinnant Jul 29 '12 at 17:49

As far as I am aware, it is well-defined behaviour to alias an object which does not yet exist. This is the same situation as you can find using this in the constructor initialization list, which is unfortunate but common and well-defined.

share|improve this answer
    
It is well defined behavior to alias (and only alias, not use) an object that is under construction, but in the code in question std::get is called with an argument that has not yet finished construction, and depending on the implementation of get and tuple you might be causing undefined behavior just there. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 26 '12 at 18:59
    
I don't believe there is any possible implementation of std::get which is not a simple alias operation. –  Puppy Jul 26 '12 at 19:00

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