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I'm trying to stagger a div class in a stair type fashion, so it looks like this

1
 2
  3
   4

Edit: I want to change the top margin so each placement of the .process div is lower than the one before it. I have them floated so they'll sit side by side, but I'd also like each div to sit lower than the last.

I attempted to use nth-child which, of course, just added the top margin to all of the elements because it started counting at the first element and simply added the set margin to all of the divs. I know you can create a counter using CSS, but can you increment a margin using CSS?

CSS

.process {
    float: left;
    width: 20%;
}

.process:nth-child(1n+2) {
    margin-top: 1em;
}

HTML

<!-- #dprocess -->
<div id="dprocess">


    <!-- .process -->
    <div class="process">

        <p>Name Goes Here</p>

    <!-- /.process -->
    </div>


    <!-- .process -->
    <div class="process">

        <p>Name Goes Here</p>

    <!-- /.process -->
    </div>


    <!-- .process -->
    <div class="process">

        <p>Name Goes Here</p>

    <!-- /.process -->
    </div>


    <!-- .process -->
    <div class="process">

        <p>Name Goes Here</p>

    <!-- /.process -->
    </div>


    <!-- .process -->
    <div class="process">

        <p>Name Goes Here</p>

    <!-- /.process -->
    </div>


<!-- /#dprocess -->
</div>
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand how adding a top margin is going to have the effect of indenting the divs. –  Mike Brant Jul 26 '12 at 18:48
    
I want to change the top margin so each placement of the .process div is lower than the one before it. I have them floated so they'll sit side by side, but I'd also like each div to sit lower than the last. –  Alina Jul 26 '12 at 18:54
    
OK. The nth-child selector will just allow to select specific element which are nth child of a parent and allow you to apply a common rule to them. In other words it doesn't allow you to apply n*1em margin to the elements. –  Mike Brant Jul 26 '12 at 18:58
1  
Do you have an upper limit for the number of blocks? –  biziclop Jul 26 '12 at 19:10
1  
Bad example: jsfiddle.net/C4TWc Better: jsfiddle.net/C4TWc/1 –  biziclop Jul 26 '12 at 19:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you have a very limited set of elements it is okay to use copypasting:

http://jsfiddle.net/C4TWc/1/

HTML:

<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>

CSS:

div {
    float: left;
    width: 20%;
}

div:first-child + div { margin-top: 2em; }
div:first-child + div + div { margin-top: 4em; }
div:first-child + div + div + div { margin-top: 6em; }
div:first-child + div + div + div + div { margin-top: 8em; }
div:first-child + div + div + div + div + div { margin-top: 10em; }
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's a very generic solution you have there, and you only need <number of divs> CSS rules to achieve it! (sorry if I sounded stingy, but seriously, that solution would break horribly in the long term). –  Second Rikudo Jul 26 '12 at 19:19
    
It's true, but OP wants to layout exactly 5 elements. –  biziclop Jul 26 '12 at 19:22
    
Today, tomorrow he might want 42. –  Second Rikudo Jul 26 '12 at 19:22
    
Today and tomorrow and the following day I only want 5 elements. It's for a set section that doesn't change and won't change in the future without being completely redesigned in a different layout. I'm saving your version, though @Truth because I have another section that requires multiple staggers with an unknown number. I'll use yours there. –  Alina Jul 26 '12 at 19:26

Have you considered changing the markup?

<div>
    1
    <div>
        2
        <div>
            3
            <div>
                4
                <div>
                    5
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<style type="text/css">
    * {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
    }
    div {
        margin-left: 10px;
    }
</style>

That markup also seems more suited for the job (given the hirarchial structure you want).

share|improve this answer
    
No, I hadn't thought about using nested lists, but it's definitely a solution I can work with. –  Alina Jul 26 '12 at 19:18

Another possible way (breaks very easily):

http://jsfiddle.net/C4TWc/2/

HTML:

<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>
<div>name</div>

CSS:

div {
    display: block;
}

div ~ div:before {
    content: '';
    width:  20%;
    height: 2em;
    float: left;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see that, it does break easy. I'll stick to the other solution you gave me. –  Alina Jul 26 '12 at 20:06

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