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Is there a better way of doing this

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

class Base
{
    int id;
    public:
    Base(int* p) : id(*p) {}
    virtual int gint1() = 0;
    virtual int gint2() = 0;
    virtual int gint3() = 0;
    virtual int gint4() = 0;
    virtual int gint5() = 0;
    virtual int gint6() = 0;
    virtual int gint7() = 0;
    virtual int gint8() = 0;
    virtual int gint9() = 0;
};

class id1 : public Base       // Base::id = 1
{
    int int1;
    int int2;
    int int3;

    public:
    id1(int* p) : Base(p) { int1 = *++p; int2 = *++p; int3 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return int1; }
    int gint2() { return int2; }
    int gint3() { return int3; }
    int gint4() { return -1; }
    int gint5() { return -1; }
    int gint6() { return -1; }
    int gint7() { return -1; }
    int gint8() { return -1; }
    int gint9() { return -1; }
};

class id2 : public id1       // Base::id = 2
{
    int int4;
    int int5;
    int int6;

    public:
    id2(int* p) : id1(p) { p += 3; int4 = *++p; int5 = *++p; int6 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return id1::gint1(); }
    int gint2() { return id1::gint2(); }
    int gint3() { return id1::gint3(); }
    int gint4() { return int4; }
    int gint5() { return int5; }
    int gint6() { return int6; }
    int gint7() { return -1; }
    int gint8() { return -1; }
    int gint9() { return -1; }
};

class id3 : public id2       // Base::id = 3
{
    int int7;
    int int8;
    int int9;

    public:
    id3(int* p) : id2(p) { p += 6; int7 = *++p; int8 = *++p; int9 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return id1::gint1(); }
    int gint2() { return id1::gint2(); }
    int gint3() { return id1::gint3(); }
    int gint4() { return id2::gint4(); }
    int gint5() { return id2::gint5(); }
    int gint6() { return id2::gint6(); }
    int gint7() { return int7; }
    int gint8() { return int8; }
    int gint9() { return int9; }
};

int main()
{
    int mem1[] = { 1, 1, 2, 3 };
    int mem2[] = { 2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
    int mem3[] = { 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };


    std::unique_ptr<Base> uptr1(new id1(mem1));
    std::unique_ptr<Base> uptr2(new id2(mem2));
    std::unique_ptr<Base> uptr3(new id3(mem3));

    cout << uptr1->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint3() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint4() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint5() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint6() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint7() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint8() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint9() << endl;
    cout << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint3() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint4() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint5() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint6() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint7() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint8() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint9() << endl;
    cout << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint3() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint4() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint5() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint6() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint7() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint8() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint9() << endl;
}

other than the obvious way below ?

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

class id1      // id = 1
{
    int id;
    int int1;
    int int2;
    int int3;
    public:
    id1(int* p) { id = *p; int1 = *++p; int2 =*++p; int3 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return int1; }
    int gint2() { return int2; }
    int gint3() { return int3; }
};

class id2     // id = 2
{
    int id;
    int int1;
    int int2;
    int int3;
    int int4;
    int int5;
    int int6;
    public:
    id2(int* p) { id = *p; int1 = *++p; int2 =*++p; int3 = *++p; int4 = *++p; int5 = *++p; int6 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return int1; }
    int gint2() { return int2; }
    int gint3() { return int3; }
    int gint4() { return int4; }
    int gint5() { return int5; }
    int gint6() { return int6; }
};

class id3     // id = 3
{
    int id;
    int int1;
    int int2;
    int int3;
    int int4;
    int int5;
    int int6;
    int int7;
    int int8;
    int int9;
    public:
    id3(int* p) { id = *p; int1 = *++p; int2 =*++p; int3 = *++p; int4 = *++p; int5 = *++p; int6 = *++p; int7 = *++p;
                  int8 = *++p; int9 = *++p; }
    int gint1() { return int1; }
    int gint2() { return int2; }
    int gint3() { return int3; }
    int gint4() { return int4; }
    int gint5() { return int5; }
    int gint6() { return int6; }
    int gint7() { return int7; }
    int gint8() { return int8; }
    int gint9() { return int9; }
};

int main()
{
    int mem1[] = { 1, 1, 2, 3 };
    int mem2[] = { 2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
    int mem3[] = { 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

    std::unique_ptr<id1> uptr1(new id1(mem1));
    std::unique_ptr<id2> uptr2(new id2(mem2));
    std::unique_ptr<id3> uptr3(new id3(mem3));

    cout << uptr1->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr1->gint3() << endl;
    cout << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint3() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint4() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint5() << endl;
    cout << uptr2->gint6() << endl;
    cout << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint1() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint2() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint3() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint4() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint5() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint6() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint7() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint8() << endl;
    cout << uptr3->gint9() << endl;
}

Of course, in the first case we have to assume that int1, int2, int3, int4, int5, int6, int7, int8 and int9 are all non-negative integers, which is not required in the second alternative.

Edit : the fact that all class members are integers was made just as a simplification for the example. They could be short, unsigned short, unsigned int, long, unsigned long.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Mat, Nicol Bolas, Bo Persson, Alan Stokes, talonmies Jul 27 '12 at 11:16

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
o.O … have you heard about arrays? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 26 '12 at 18:59
3  
It all depends on what you're doing. What is this even for? –  GManNickG Jul 26 '12 at 18:59
1  
Make your data members an array and make the function take an index argument instead of having one for each. –  chris Jul 26 '12 at 18:59
    
The fact that all members are integers is a simplification for the example. In reality, you could have int, short, unsigned int, unsigned short, long, unsigned long, etc..., mixed up in the same class. –  user1162978 Jul 26 '12 at 19:01
3  
osnews.com/story/19266/WTFs_m –  cHao Jul 26 '12 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

You could clean all of this up into one class:

class cBase
{

public:
    int ID() { return m_id; };
    int getNumber( int index ) 
    { 
         if ( index > -1 && index < MAX_NUM ) return m_ints[index]; 
         else return -1
    };

int[] getArray() { return m_ints };

    protected:
    int     m_ints[];
    int     m_id;
    int     MAX_NUM;

    cBase(int numSpaceInArray )
    {
        MAX_NUM = numSpaceInArray;
        m_ints = new int[MAX_NUM];
    }
    ~cBase()
    {
        delete m_ints;
    }
}

Then you simple need to pass in how many spaces you need in the array, and you don't need to worry about inheritance at all.

share|improve this answer

Can't make much out of your question too but I think you want a descendent class or two/three which share the same functionality. One way to do that is this. However you gave way too little information to get a good advice. Until then I think you can fiddle with this to learn more.

enum eError{
    OUT_OF_BOUNDS = 1,
};

class cBase{
public:
    int     ID(){ return m_id; };
    virtual int Get( int index ) = 0;
protected:
    int     m_ints[ 8 ];
    int     m_id;
};

class cDecendent1 : public cBase{
public:
    id()
    : m_id( 1 ){
    }
    virtual int Get( int index ){
        if( index < 0 || index > 3 ) return eError::OUT_OF_BOUNDS;
        // Although working ok, you will have memory of the size of int times 4 (index=4 to 7) you won't use. And that's just a pitty.
        return m_ints[ index ];
    }
};

class cDecendent2 : public cBase{
public:
    id()
    : m_id( 2 ){
    }
    virtual int Get( int index ){
        if( index < 0 || index > 7 ) return eError::OUT_OF_BOUNDS;
        // also hardcoding (the 0 and 7 above) ain't too fond to do. Think flexability.
        return m_ints[ index ];
    }
};

see the two comments and fiddle around, search some good sites about programming. You will find out what I did and more over, why even this ain't the way. But it might help you along a bit.

BTW: The obvious I couldn't find ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Have you seen my edit ? The fact that all class members are int's was made this way just as a simplification for the example. In my case they can be short, long, unsigned short, unsigned int or unsigned long, all mixed up in each class. You said you didn't see the obvious solution ? Strange, it should be just below the first one. –  user1162978 Jul 26 '12 at 19:25
    
didn't see any edit just until after I posted this. I was writing an example. Add an protected std::string m_test in cDecendent2, and there you have multiple types withing multiple types. Or instead a std::string, use a pointer to whatever and you can add whatever. As I said, fiddle with it. –  user1555816 Jul 26 '12 at 19:31

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