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I have the following problem (simplified).

I have a list of dogs:

public List<Dog> dogs { get; set; }

I currently access this list as a json object by converting it in a view:

@(new HtmlString(@Json.Encode(@ViewBag.dogs)))

I then iterate through this json object using javascript and display it on a page.

I would like to add cars to this list.

However, since the list is strongly typed as a list of dogs my first thought was to create the list as the one thing dogs and cars have in common, they're both objects.

When I tried to change my list of dogs into a list of objects, I received the following error

Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<object>' to System.Collections.Generic.List<dog>

I researched that and found this question which didn't help me much except to tell me that I would not be able to have a list of dogs and cars. For my purposes, however, this isn't suitable. I need my list to contain both dogs and cars, so that I have access to both of them in my application.

One solution I anticipate being suggested is that I have two separate lists, and make two separate ajax requests. However, I need to mix cars and dogs in a specific order (based on the time they were created essentially) so that solution isn't ideal.

In short, I'm wondering what the best way to accomplish this is. Perhaps I've gone off in completely the wrong direction, so I'm not opposed to doing something completely different if it makes sense.

Thanks for the help as always!

EDIT: I've tried the cast and that works. However, I need to access a property of dog (let's call it "fur") and I don't seem to be able to do that (do I need to cast again?)

'object' does not contain a definition for 'fur'
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1  
Somewhere in the system you still have the dogs property defined as a type of List<Dog>. Otherwise it should work. –  mellamokb Jul 26 '12 at 19:06
1  
@mellamokb somewhere? Do you mean where he declared dogs? ;) –  jsmith Jul 26 '12 at 19:12
1  
@Mansfield Yes, you need to cast back to Dog or Car to use the object's properties. But consider: how do you know whether an arbitrary object from the list is a Dog or Car? –  Esoteric Screen Name Jul 26 '12 at 19:14
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can make list that contains both dogs and cars only if they implement the same interface or extends same class (e.g. object, then you can use typeof in condition to perform some actions on them).

EDIT:

Simple example

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Polymorphism
{
    class Program
    {
        public class Car
        {
            public string Drive()
            {
                return "Wrrrr!";
            }
        }

        public class Dog 
        {
            public string Talk()
            {
                return "Woof";
            }
        }

        static void Main()
        {
            var car = new Car();
            var dog = new Dog();

            List<object> list = new List<object>();
            list.Add(car);
            list.Add(dog);

            foreach (object o in list)
            {
                if (o is Car)
                    Console.WriteLine((o as Car).Drive());
                else
                    Console.WriteLine((o as Dog).Talk());
            }
        }
    }
}

I'm sorry for that code but I copied it from Wikipedia and edited using Ideone

share|improve this answer
    
+1 was just going to add an answer showing an abstract base class as well as an interface :) –  jim tollan Jul 26 '12 at 19:11
    
It sounds like the OP has a property "fur" that he wants to access.. I guess you could make an interface that has a property "fur", and the car inherits it... I have seen a furry car, although, it was in a move called dumb and dumber... –  jsmith Jul 26 '12 at 19:18
    
@jsmith: Haha :) Only a dog has the property 'fur' in this instance. The car is quite hairless. –  Mansfield Jul 26 '12 at 19:20
1  
Sometimes when you don't take care of your car it can go wild –  janisz Jul 26 '12 at 19:28
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It's not really clear to me where the cars come in, and why you can't just change your property to be a List<object> to start with, but you can do:

List<object> objects = foo.Dogs.Cast<object>().ToList();

or in C# 4, you could use generic covariance and just write:

List<object> objects = foo.Dogs.ToList<object>();
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I did just change the property to be a list of objects. What I inferred from the linked question is that I wasn't able to have two separate types of objects inhabit the same list. Perhaps I misunderstood? –  Mansfield Jul 26 '12 at 19:08
    
@Mansfield: Sounds like you misunderstood. A List<object> can certainly contain references to both Dog objects and Car objects. The linked question was describing why an object of type List<object> can't be cast to List<string> or vice versa. –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '12 at 19:11
    
So it would seem. I tried the cast and that helped, but now I have a new problem (see my edit to the question) –  Mansfield Jul 26 '12 at 19:13
1  
@Mansfield: Well yes - if you only know you've got an object, you won't know about the Dog-specific properties, will you? You could use List<dynamic> if you really want to throw compile-time safety to the wind... –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '12 at 19:15
    
+1 on the dynamic version! Who needs compile-time safety! Out the window she goes! –  jsmith Jul 26 '12 at 19:17
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The simplest way to have different objects in a list and access a property that they have in common is to use an Interface on the classes.

For example:

public interface ICoated {
    string Coating { get; set; }
}

public class Dog : ICoated {
    public string Coating {
        get { return Fur; }
        set { Fur = value; }
    }
}

public class Car: ICoated {
    public string Coating {
        get { return PaintJob; }
        set { PaintJob = value; }
    }
}

You would then use a List<ICoated> in order to access objects that are all coated with something. Obviously, if you have many common attributes, you would then extend this model appropriately.

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try to work out what's common between the two objects and use either a base class or an interface. if you used an interface, you might have it looking like this:

public interface IAnimal{
   Fur Fur{ get; set; }
   bool CanBark { get; set;}
}

public class Dog : IAnimal {
   public Fur Fur{ get; set; }
   public bool CanBark { get; set;}
}

public class Cat: IAnimal {
   public Fur Fur{ get; set; }
   public bool CanBark { get; set;}
}

public class Fur{
    public string Color {get;set;}
    public int Length {get;set}
}

etc, etc

then, your lists can be:

public List<IAnimal> dogs { get; set; }
public List<IAnimal> cats{ get; set; }

(pet) food for thought

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lol, apparently we were thinking alike :) –  Jay S Jul 26 '12 at 19:20
    
While this is correct, he's wanting a car, not a cat. –  jsmith Jul 26 '12 at 19:20
    
jsmith - I KNEW that, but was adding my mrs malapropism :-) –  jim tollan Jul 26 '12 at 19:21
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I would probably make an interface that has shared properties, and a "Type" property.

public enum CrazyObjectType
{
    Dog,
    Car
}

public interface ICrazyObject
{
    DateTime Date { get; }
    CrazyOjbectType MyObjectType { get; }
}

public class Dog : ICrazyObject
{
    public Dog()
    {
        MyObjectType = CrazyObjectType.Dog;
    }

    public DateTime Date { get; }
    public CrazyObjectType MyObjectType { get; }
}

public class Car : ICrazyObject
{
    public Car()
    {
        MyObjectType = CrazyObjectType.Car;
    }

    public DateTime Date { get; }
    public CrazyObjectType MyObjectType { get; }
}

Then instead of List<object> you can have a List<ICrazyObject> that you check for type before casting to a car or a dog..

foreach (var myObject in myObjects)
{
    if (myObject.MyObjectType == CrazyObjectType.Car)
    {
        var myCar = (Car)myObject;
        //Do Stuff with myCar here.
    }
}

This gives you the safety of knowing your type before casting it. Then whatever properties you have in type car that are different than dog. You can access easily, and safely!

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