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Here's Eric Lippert's comment from this post:

Now that you know the answer, you can solve this puzzle: write me a program in which there is a reachable goto which goes to an unreachable label. – Eric Lippert Jul 17 at 7:17

I am not able to create a code which will have reachable goto pointing to an unreachable label. Is that even possible? If yes, what would the C# code look like?

Note: Let's not get into discussion about how 'goto' is bad etc. This is a theoretical exercise.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

My original answer:

    try
    {
        goto ILikeCheese;
    }
    finally
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("You only have cottage cheese.");
    }
ILikeCheese:
    Console.WriteLine("MMM. Cheese is yummy.");

Here is without the compiler warning.

    bool jumping = false;
    try
    {
        if (DateTime.Now < DateTime.MaxValue)
        {
            jumping = (Environment.NewLine != "\t");
            goto ILikeCheese;
        }

        return;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (jumping)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("You only have cottage cheese.");
    }
ILikeCheese:
    Console.WriteLine("MMM. Cheese is yummy.");
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1  
Wrong. The documentation for goto says that when it is in a try-finally block, the finally will still be executed. –  Will Eddins Jul 22 '09 at 19:40
6  
@Guard: Isn't that the point? –  Sam Harwell Jul 22 '09 at 19:42
1  
I thought the question was the goto needs to reach an unreachable label. In this case, an exception will be thrown by the finally, crashing it before it reaches the label. –  Will Eddins Jul 22 '09 at 19:45
2  
Yeah this is a bit like the "chicken and the egg", if a reachable goto can go to an unreachable label, doesn't that make the label reachable? –  John Rasch Jul 22 '09 at 19:49
4  
Congratulations, that is the answer I had in mind. The goto is reachable but the label it targets is not because the "finally" hijacks it. The code in the compiler which detects that case is arcane, to say the least. –  Eric Lippert Jul 22 '09 at 22:28

By the way if you use goto the csharp compiler for example for this case without finally block changes the code to a version without goto.

using System;
public class InternalTesting
{
public static void Main(string[] args)
{
  bool jumping = false;
    try
    {
        if (DateTime.Now < DateTime.MaxValue)
        {
            jumping = (Environment.NewLine != "\t");
            goto ILikeCheese;
        }
    else{
            return;
    }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (jumping)
{
            //throw new InvalidOperationException("You only have cottage cheese.");
    Console.WriteLine("Test Me Deeply");
}
    }
ILikeCheese:
    Console.WriteLine("MMM. Cheese is yummy.");
}
}

Turns To:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    bool flag = false;
    try
    {
        if (DateTime.Now < DateTime.MaxValue)
        {
            flag = Environment.NewLine != "\t";
        }
        else
        {
            return;
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (flag)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Test Me Deeply");
        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine("MMM. Cheese is yummy.");
}
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goto cant_reach_me;

try{
cant_reach_me:
}
catch{}

This is either a compile or runtime error, I can not remember. The label must be outside the try/catch block

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