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I'm trying to figure out a good way to do parallelization of code that does processing of big datasets and then imports the resulting data into RavenDb.

The data processing is CPU bound and database import IO bound.

I'm looking for a solution to do the processing in parallel on Environment.ProcessorCount number of threads. The resulting data should then be imported into RavenDb on x (lets say 10) pooled threads in parallel with the above process.

The main thing here is I want the processing to continue while completed data is being imported so that processing the next dataset continues while waiting for the import to complete.

Another issue is the memory for each batch needs to be discarded after a successful import as the private working memory can easily reach >5GB.

The code below is what I've got so far. Do note that it does not fullfill the parallelization requirements outlined above.

datasupplier.GetDataItems()
    .Partition(batchSize)
    .AsParallel()
    .WithDegreeOfParallelism(Environment.ProcessorCount)
    .ForAll(batch =>
    {
        Task.Run(() =>
        {
            ...
        }
    }

GetDataItem yields enumerable data items that are partitioned into a batch dataset. GetDataItem will yield ~2,000,000 items each averaging around 0.3ms for processing.

The project is running on the latest .NET 4.5 RC on a x64 platform.

Update.

My current code (seen above) will fetch items and partition them in batches. Each batch is processed in parallel on eight threads (Environment.ProcessorCount on i7). The processing is slow, cpu-bound and memory intensive. When processing of a single batch is complete, a task is started to asynchronously import the resulting data into RavenDb. The batch import job is itself synchronous and looks like:

using (var session = Store.OpenSession())
{
    foreach (var data in batch)
    {
        session.Store(data);
    }
    session.SaveChanges();
}

There are a few problems with this approach:

  1. Every time a batch is completed a task is started to run the import job. I want to limit the number of tasks that run in parallel (eg. max 10). Additionally even though many tasks are started they seem to never run in parallel.

  2. Memory allocations are a huge problem. Once a batch is processed/imported it seems to still remain in memory.

I'm looking for ways to take care of the issues outlined above. Ideally I want:

  • One thread per logical processor doing heavy lifting processing batches of data.
  • Ten or so parallel threads waiting for completed batches to import into RavenDb.
  • To keep memory allocations to a minimum which means unallocating a batch after the import task is complete.
  • To not run import jobs on one of the threads for batch processing. Import of completed batches should run in parallel to the next batch being processed.

Solution

var batchSize = 10000;
var bc = new BlockingCollection<List<Data>>();
var importTask = Task.Run(() =>
{
    bc.GetConsumingEnumerable()
        .AsParallel()
        .WithExecutionMode(ParallelExecutionMode.ForceParallelism)
        .WithMergeOptions(ParallelMergeOptions.NotBuffered)
        .ForAll(batch =>
        {
            using (var session = Store.OpenSession())
            {
                foreach (var i in batch) session.Store(i);
                session.SaveChanges();
            }
        });
});
var processTask = Task.Run(() =>
{
    datasupplier.GetDataItems()
        .Partition(batchSize)
        .AsParallel()
        .WithDegreeOfParallelism(Environment.ProcessorCount)
        .ForAll(batch =>
        {
            bc.Add(batch.Select(i => new Data()
            {
                ...
            }).ToList());
        });
});

processTask.Wait();
bc.CompleteAdding();
importTask.Wait();
share|improve this question
2  
Does your code not work? Use too much memory? Is it too slow? –  Servy Jul 26 '12 at 19:43
    
Can you elaborate and specifically type in your question? Ideally, what's happening with your current code vs. what you expect it should do. –  Only Bolivian Here Jul 26 '12 at 19:43
    
I'm not very familiar with RavenDb's API. Does it have a BeginWrite/EndWrite pattern with non-blocking I/O or synchronous only? –  Chris Shain Jul 26 '12 at 19:50
    
Looks an awful lot like map/reduce. You might want to look into that pattern, or use a framework that supports that. I believe RavenDB has support for map/reduce at some level. –  Peter Ritchie Jul 26 '12 at 19:56
1  
You may want to look at the WorkList pattern here, simply add workItems of the block size you want, then assign a num_of_workers to process them as the come into the ConcurrentQueue. –  Xantix Jul 27 '12 at 4:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your task overall sounds like a producer-consumer workflow. Your batch processors are producers, and your RavenDB data "import" are the consumers of the output of the producers.

Consider using a BlockingCollection<T> as the connection between your batch proccesors and your db importers. The db importers will wake up as soon as the batch processors push completed batches into the blocking collection, and will go back to sleep when they have "caught up" and emptied the collection.

The batch processor producers can run full throttle and will always be running concurrent with the db importer tasks processing previously completed batches. If you are concerned that the batch processors may get too far ahead of the db importers (b/c db import takes significantly longer than processing each batch) you can set an upper bound on the blocking collection so that the producers will block when they add beyond that limit, giving the consumers a chance to catch up.

Some of your comments are worrisome, though. There's nothing particularly wrong with spinning up a Task instance to perform the db import asynchronously to the batch processing. Task != Thread. Creating new task instances does not have the same monumental overhead of creating new threads.

Don't get hung up on trying to control threads too precisely. Even if you specify that you want exactly as many buckets as you have cores, you don't get exclusive use of those cores. Hundreds of other threads from other processes will still be scheduled in between your time slices. Specify the logical units of work using Tasks and let the TPL manage the thread pool. Save yourself the frustration of a false sense of control. ;>

In your comments, you indicate that your tasks do not appear to be running async to each other (how are you determining this?) and memory does not appear to be released after each batch is finished. I'd suggest dropping everything until you can figure out what is up with those two problems first. Are you forgetting to call Dispose() somewhere? Are you holding onto a reference that is keeping a whole tree of objects alive unnecessarily? Are you measuring the right thing? Are the parallel tasks being serialized by a blocking database or network I/O? Until these two issues are resolved it doesn't matter what your parallelism plan is.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for these suggestions. I'm going to look into BlockingCollection. The issue I want to avoid with tasks is the lack of control over how many threads are in use. I can easily optimize the number concurrent io-bound tasks for the activity, which the scheduler will have very little possibility to do. The reasoning behind parallelization of batch processing on number of logical cores is that batch jobs are not multithreaded. Even though TPL will manage the threads you would need at least the same amount of threads as logical cores to utilize the entire CPU in a best case scenario. –  magix Jul 27 '12 at 1:08
    
The tasks don't seem to be running async to each other due to the debug output indicating that a task is always completed (last line hit) before another one (first line hit) being started. It is true that it could be any number of things and does not necessarily have to be related to the Task code. –  magix Jul 27 '12 at 1:08

For each batch you are starting a task. This means that your loop completes very quickly. It leaves (number of batches) tasks behind which is not what you wanted. You wanted (number of CPUs).

Solution: Don't start a new task for each batch. The for loop is already parallel.

In response to your comment, here is an improved version:

//this runs in parallel
var processedBatches = datasupplier.GetDataItems()
    .Partition(batchSize)
    .AsParallel()
    .WithDegreeOfParallelism(Environment.ProcessorCount)
    .Select(x => ProcessCpuBound(x));

foreach (var batch in processedBatches) {
 PerformIOIntensiveWorkSingleThreadedly(batch); //this runs sequentially
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to block batch processing threads with the io-bound task of importing said batch. Import task must run in parallel to the next batch being processed. Hence my flawed code that starts a new task to import each batch into RavenDb. This allows the batch processing to continue uninterrupted but opens up another set of problems. –  magix Jul 26 '12 at 21:59
    
I have added a possible solution. –  usr Jul 26 '12 at 22:58
    
I would like to be able to run more than one concurrent PerformIOIntensiveWorkSingleThreadedly(batch). Another issue is that I want to avoid storing references to all batches (eliminates the foreach) as the dataset is huge. There simply is not enough memory to hold it. –  magix Jul 27 '12 at 1:13
    
a) You can make the foreach loop a Parallel.ForEach with a (potentially different) degree of parallelism. b) The PLINQ query is in streaming mode meaning that it won't hold onto all memory. It will produce items as they are requested (with a small, bounded buffer). You can try to add merge options to control buffering (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997424.aspx). –  usr Jul 27 '12 at 10:25

I recently built something similar, I used the Queue class vs List with the Parallel.Foreach. I found that too many threads actually slowed things down, there is a sweet spot.

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