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Yesterday, I posted about prototypal inheritance and constructors. I finally settled on an approach that keeps the code nice and tidy and leaves the prototype alone at the cost of possibly minor performance impact:

function Card(value) {
    // setValue is a public instance method
    this.setValue = function (val) {
        if (!range[val]) {
            val = drawRandom();
        }

        // value is a public instance variable
        this.value = val;

        return val;
    };

    this.setValue(value);
}

My problem with this approach, however, is that I have to call the setValue method whenever I want to set the value of a Card instance to get the validation. What I'd like to do instead is have a custom setter method. Here's what I have so far:

function Card(val) {
    // value is a private instance variable
    var value;

    // This is a private instance method
    // It's also self-invoking, but that's beside the point
    (function (x) {
        if (!range[x]) {
            x = drawRandom();
        }

        value = x;
    }(val));

    this.__defineGetter__("value", function () {
        return value;
    });

    // Some code duplication
    this.__defineSetter__("value", function (x) {
        if (!range[x]) {
            return false;
        }

        value = x;

        return x;
    });
}

This works well. Calling var card = new Card() gives me an instance with a random value, and calling card.value = null fails because it's out of range.

My problem with this, other than the fact that it is obviously much longer, is it seems like I'm duplicating some of the code. It would be nice if the setter method was called along with the constructor. That way, I could eliminate the whole self-invoking private instance method.

share|improve this question
    
Why not just write this.value = val; after defining the setter method? (sorry it took me so many tries to word that comment properly :-) –  Pointy Jul 26 '12 at 19:49
1  
Object.defineProperty is more widely supported –  Matt Greer Jul 26 '12 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, you should always set the value with obj.value = newValue, even internally, because it invokes your validation. When in the constructor that means:

this.value = val;

But that won't work if you do it before the setter and getter are declared. So move it after so that the setter function will exist when it's set.


Working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/8tCjm/4/

var drawRandom = function () {
    return Math.floor(Math.random() * 3) + 1;
};

var range = {
    1: 'Ace',
    2: 'Two',
    3: 'Three'
};

function Card(val) {
    var value;

    this.__defineGetter__('value', function () {
        return value;
    });

    this.__defineSetter__('value', function (x) {
        if (range[x]) {
            value = x;
        } else {
            value = drawRandom();
        }

        return value;
    });

    this.value = val;
};

console.log(new Card(1).value); // 1
console.log(new Card(2).value); // 2
console.log(new Card(3).value); // 3

console.log(new Card(987).value); // not 987 (1-3)
​
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I understand your suggestion. this.value means that value would become a public property and I would not be able to protect it by means of a setter function. Furthermore, I only want the value to be random if the value that is given is not in the range. –  Koveras Jul 26 '12 at 20:03
1  
If you call this.value from inside the constructor after you create the setter function, the setter function is invoked and used. this.value = 123 and obj.value = 123 do the same thing if this === obj. Though rereading your question you probably want this.value = value; instead. And if that is out of range, the setter will fix it. –  Alex Wayne Jul 26 '12 at 20:07
    
I tried changing return value to return this.value in my getter and value = x to this.value = x in my setter and Firefox died: too much recursion: this.value = x; –  Koveras Jul 26 '12 at 20:17
1  
Updated my answer with a working example. You got that error because this.value invokes the getter function, and if you call that from the getter, obviously it will call itself. Keep in mind that var value and this.value are totally unrelated. They are 2 totally different variables and can be handled independently. So use this.value and this.value = everywhere, except the getter/setter where you access the local variable directly. –  Alex Wayne Jul 26 '12 at 20:21
    
x is always null. Do I need to set x = val? –  Koveras Jul 26 '12 at 20:26

Functions are first class objects in Javascript, so you can totally just do something like this to eliminate the duplication:

function setter (x) {
    if (!range[x]) {
        return false;
    }
    return x;
}
(function (x) {
    value = setter(x);
    if (!value) {
        value = drawRandom();
    }

}(val));

this.__defineGetter__("value", function () {
    return value;
});

// Some code duplication
this.__defineSetter__("value", setter);
share|improve this answer
    
This works very well but ultimately I went with Alex's solution. –  Koveras Jul 26 '12 at 20:48

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