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I'm just getting into HTML and CSS and I have a quick question. Is there any way to make a parent element grow in size to accommodate one of its children? I have the background set on <html>. Then inside the body I have a div which sets a different background color and isn't as wide/tall as the whole page. This leaves a two toned design. Then, I have a nested div containing all the content to be displayed. This all works fine, unless the page content is enough that a scroll bar is necessary. If that happens, both background colors are lost past the original bottom of the screen. This problem is extremely annoying and from what I've read there is no great way to handle it, but I wanted to see if anyone knew. I have the following properties set:

html {
    background: [gradient code...]
    height: auto;
    min-height: 100%;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-size: 100%;
}

body {
    height: auto;
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    top: 0;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    border: 0;
}

div.background {
    background-color: #D0D0D0;
    text-align: center;
    height: auto;
    width: 70%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 150px;
    bottom: 30px;
    left: 15%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    border-radius: 7px;
}

div.container {
    height: auto;
    width: 70%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 15%;
    bottom: 0;
    top: 0;
}

Where div.background has the second background color and div.container has the content displayed on the page.

Thanks for your help.

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3 Answers 3

How about not using position: absolute? Remove that (and the associated top, left, bottom...) and replace them with correct margins instead.

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I'm not quite sure what you mean by "correct margins"..I was using position: absolute to anchor these items to the bottom of the <html> element. –  andrew.cuthbert Jul 26 '12 at 20:05

I believe if you specify size (width, height) auto on the parent (or just leave it without specifying size) it grows/shrinks to fit the children's size (it doesn't work recursively, so you may want to go up to the last parent in the tree). Avoiding absolute positioning (http://www.w3schools.com/Css/css_positioning.asp) could also do the trick, and float element or a different z-index could probably do the workaround too, but overgrowing the parent, I think...

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If you get rid of the width and position absolute div.background and change position absolute to relative for div.container you should be good


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