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How might I go about calculating PI in C# to a certain number of decimal places?

I want to be able to pass a number into a method and get back PI calculated to that number of decimal places.

public decimal CalculatePi(int places)
{
    // magic
    return pi;
}

Console.WriteLine(CalculatePi(5)); // Would print 3.14159

Console.WriteLine(CalculatePi(10)); // Would print 3.1415926535

etc...

I don't care about the speed of the program. I just want it to be as simple and easy to understand as it can be. Thanks in advance for the help.

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1  
Simple to understand in terms of programming, or in terms of math? –  Egor Jul 26 '12 at 20:21
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Dani Jul 26 '12 at 20:22
1  
Take a look here: dotnetperls.com/pi There are sample methods that calculate pi to 20 places, however some limitations are discussed such as lack of precision –  Robert H Jul 26 '12 at 20:22
    
@Egor programming. –  Alex Ford Jul 26 '12 at 20:24
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6 Answers

Math.Round(Math.PI, places)

If you need more precision you will have trouble using the double data type as it supports a certain max. precision (which is provided by Math.PI).

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Yes, you did answer the question, but no this was not what the question asker wanted ;-). –  Toon Krijthe Jul 26 '12 at 20:25
    
This only lets me go to 15 places. –  Alex Ford Jul 26 '12 at 20:27
1  
Decimal always has 4 decimal places? Where did you get that idea? –  Matt Burland Jul 26 '12 at 20:29
    
@AlexFord: Then you need to define the domain of your problem better. This method works for the two examples you give (5 and 10 d.p.) What is you maximum number of decimal places? –  Matt Burland Jul 26 '12 at 20:34
1  
@usr: Yes, I know what decimal is for, but your comment is still nonsense. If I do this: decimal myPi = (decimal)Math.Round(Math.PI, 10); I get 3.1415926536. In other words, 10 decimal places in a decimal type. Go ahead and check the MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.decimal.aspx) –  Matt Burland Jul 26 '12 at 21:03
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If you are satisfied with the number of digits provided by the native math library, then it is simple; just round to the desired number of digits. If you need more digits (dozens, or hundreds, or thousands), you need a spigot algorithm that spits out the digits one at a time. Jeremy Gibbons gives an algorithm which I implement twice at my blog, where you will find code in Scheme, C, Python, Haskell, Perl and Forth (but not C#, sorry).

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First, assuming you want some arbitrary number of digits of pi, and we do not want to be confined with the precision of any of the various floating point numbers out there, let us define a Pi function as a string rather than any number type.

One of the coolest algorithms I found while searching for this technique is the Stanley Rabinowitz and Stan Wagon - Spigot Algorithm. It requires no floating point math, and is mostly an iterative method. It does require some memory for storing integer arrays in the intermediate calculations.

Without taking the time to streamline or clean the code here is an implementation of the algorithm (note the result does not add the decimal point).

Please be sure to cite the algorithm and this site if you intend to use this code for anything other than personal use.

C# Code

static public string CalculatePi(int digits)
{
    string result = "";
    digits++;

    uint[] x = new uint[digits*3+2];
    uint[] r = new uint[digits*3+2];

    for (int j = 0; j < x.Length; j++)
        x[j] = 20;

    for (int i = 0; i < digits; i++)
    {
        uint carry = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < x.Length; j++)
        {
            uint num = (uint)(x.Length - j - 1);
            uint dem = num * 2 + 1;

            x[j] += carry;

            uint q = x[j] / dem;
            r[j] = x[j] % dem;

            carry = q * num;
        }
        if(i<digits-1)
            result += (x[x.Length-1] / 10).ToString();
        r[x.Length - 1] = x[x.Length - 1] % 10; ;
        for (int j = 0; j < x.Length; j++)
            x[j] = r[j] * 10;
    }

    return result;
}
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Something goes wrong after about 30 digits - maybe an overflow. I'll look at a fix later. –  nicholas Jul 26 '12 at 22:38
    
Any updates on this? I also see it start deviating from true pi around 30 digits. –  Levitikon Dec 22 '13 at 18:22
    
@Levitikon, I have not looked at this for a while, and I kind of quit working on it after a different answer was accepted. I'll review it sometime this week to see if I can't find where it goes wrong. –  nicholas Dec 23 '13 at 5:01
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

After much searching I found this little snippet:

public static class BigMath
{
    // digits = number of digits to calculate;
    // iterations = accuracy (higher the number the more accurate it will be and the longer it will take.)
    public static BigInteger GetPi(int digits, int iterations)
    {
        return 16 * ArcTan1OverX(5, digits).ElementAt(iterations)
            - 4 * ArcTan1OverX(239, digits).ElementAt(iterations);
    }

    //arctan(x) = x - x^3/3 + x^5/5 - x^7/7 + x^9/9 - ...
    public static IEnumerable<BigInteger> ArcTan1OverX(int x, int digits)
    {
        var mag = BigInteger.Pow(10, digits);
        var sum = BigInteger.Zero;
        bool sign = true;
        for (int i = 1; true; i += 2)
        {
            var cur = mag / (BigInteger.Pow(x, i) * i);
            if (sign)
            {
                sum += cur;
            }
            else
            {
                sum -= cur;
            }
            yield return sum;
            sign = !sign;
        }
    }
}

It is working like a charm so far. You just have to add the System.Numerics library from the GAC to resolve the BigInteger type.

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1  
This will be faster if you don't use IEnumerable and ElementAt, but just provide ArcTan1OverX the number of iterations to make. –  Dani Jul 27 '12 at 12:31
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The easiest way is to store a large number of digits pi in a String constant. Then whenever you need n digits of precision, you just take a substring from 0 to n+2.

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I have an easy solution. You store pi in a string, with no decimal. You'll need to store it to however many places you want, I found a website with the first one million, but I only used the first 101 (100? Not certain).

public static string pi = "31415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751058209749445923078164062862089986280348253421170679";
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Enter a number to calculate pi to:");
        while (true)
        {
            string line = Console.ReadLine();
            int input = Convert.ToInt32(line);
            CalculatePI(input);
        }
    }

    private static void CalculatePI(int places)
    {           
            string rounded = pi.Remove(places, pi.Length - places); //first parameter is where to begin removing characters at, second paramter is how many to remove
            // if places is greater than pi.Length you will get an error
            string final = rounded.Insert(1, "."); //adds the period immediately after the 3
            Console.WriteLine(final);
            Console.WriteLine("Enter a number to calculate pi to:");           
    }
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1  
None of that actual calculates anything. –  ars265 Jul 23 '13 at 17:10
    
@ars265 He asked for the simplest solution possible, every other answer here had been submitted, I gave him something that is actually easy to understand. He just wanted to get pi to a number of places and pass that to another method, it's really irrelevant how it's done. –  0_______0 Sep 3 '13 at 0:13
    
But thats not entirely true, the very title of the question is 'How to calculate pi to N number of places ...'. You're answer is simple, I give you that, but say I need the 102nd number of Pi, using your method, what happens? See my point? –  ars265 Sep 3 '13 at 13:13
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