Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am using reval from Perl's Safe module and I want to prevent it from generating warnings if the string being eval'ed can't be parsed (actually, I want to prevent it from generating any warnings at all).

For example, the following code:

use strict; use warnings;
use Safe;    
use feature qw/say/;
my $cft = Safe->new;

my $x = $cft->reval(') 1' );
my $y = $cft->reval('2'   );
say "x: $x";
say "y: $y";

results in:

Number found where operator expected at (eval 5) line 1, near ") 1"
    (Missing operator before 1?)
Use of uninitialized value $x in concatenation (.) or string at ./test line 12.
x: 
y: 2

What I'm trying to achieve is to have $x = undef and $y = 2, and no warnings. I tried to put a "no warnings;" inside a new scope, but it has no effect on the warnings produced from within the reval (although, as pointed out by @DavidO, it silences the 'uninitialized value' warning):

use strict; use warnings;
use Safe;    
use feature qw/say/;
my $cft = Safe->new;
{
    no warnings;
    my $x = $cft->reval(') 1' );
    my $y = $cft->reval('2'   );
    say "x: $x";
    say "y: $y";
}

I guess that somehow the 'no warnings' has to be inside the Safe compartment, so I also tried to prepend "no warnings;" to the strings being eval'ed:

use strict; use warnings;
use Safe;
use feature qw/say/;
my $cft = Safe->new;
{
    my $x = $cft->reval( 'no warnings;' . ') 1' );
    my $y = $cft->reval( 'no warnings;' . '2'   );
    say "x: $x";
    say "y: $y";
}

This way reval does not issue any warnings, but both variables are undef:

Use of uninitialized value $x in concatenation (.) or string at ./test line 10.
x: 
Use of uninitialized value $y in concatenation (.) or string at ./test line 11.
y:

I don't know what else to try, and I hope that the problem description was clear enough.

share|improve this question
1  
Your second attempt actually doesn't produce the same output as the first. It still produces the "compiletime" error (actually reval compiletime error), but not the runtime warning relating to interpolating an uninitialized value in your say statement. So you've actually solved half of your problem (squelched the warning) in your second snippet above. The other half (squelching the compile-time error) is more problematic. –  DavidO Jul 26 '12 at 21:20
    
Yeah, you're right about that. I didn't even notice that because my main concern here was really the reval -- the uninitialized variable warnings are a consequence of me trying to keep the example short. Anyway, I've updated the post to make it clearer. Thanks! –  andrefs Jul 26 '12 at 21:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you check $@ you'll see that $cft->reval( 'no warnings;' . ') 1' ); failed. 'require' trapped by operation mask at (eval 5) line 1.. In other words, Safe is doing its job and preventing that code from trying to load a library.

$cft->reval( 'BEGIN { warnings->unimport; } ) 1' ); would work, presuming warnings is already loaded outside the compartment. However, that won't quiet compile time errors. Unlike eval, reval seems to let them through. Use amon's technique of quieting STDERR.

share|improve this answer
    
A two tiered approach works best. The warning is being generated outside of the reval, and can be squelched at that broader scope. The compiletime error is being generated inside the reval, and is quite stubborn. This is where redirecting STDERR is the least-bad option, imho. (The other option being to explicitly allow eval inside the safe compartment, but then why bother using Save? :) ). –  DavidO Jul 26 '12 at 21:27
    
It's funny though; executing a 'qr/[c-a]/' inside the safe compartment, which is an invalid regex that will throw an error as it's being compiled, is successfully trapped by reval. –  DavidO Jul 26 '12 at 21:30
    
Thanks for the replies. @amon's method seems to be the best alternative to silence even the most severe parsing errors. The BEGIN {warnings->unimport;} seems to work except if you explicitly call something like warn "foo" in the string being evaled :P –  andrefs Jul 26 '12 at 21:46
1  
I note that the underlying routine reval calls has support for enabling or disabling strict; maybe it could use the same for warnings? Another possibility would be to give access via B (or a magic variable) to the perl internal PL_dowarn; $^W lets you set it to the basic on or off, but not the special values corresponding to the -X and -W command line flags. –  ysth Jul 27 '12 at 5:47

no warnings suppresses all the warnings the use warnings pragma generates. You would probably want to remove any strictures as well. But severe parsing errors will pop up any way.

If you want to execute any code, no matter how pathological, without any output to STDERR, you should locally modify the signal handler:

{
  # I know what I'm doing!
  local $SIG{__WARN__} = sub {}; # locally ignore any warnings
  eval $code; # catches all "die"
}

or we could reopen STDERR to /dev/null:

{
  # I know what I'm doing!
  open my $oldSTDERR, '>&' \*STDERR or die;
  close STDERR or die;
  open STDERR, '>', '/dev/null' or die;

  eval $code;

  close STDERR or die;
  open STDERR, '>&', $oldSTDERR or die;
  close $oldSTDERR;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
But eval $code isn't permitted inside a safe compartment. I think setting up $SIG{} handlers is also prohibited (and for good reason). Setting up a $SIG{} handler outside of the reval won't be effective either. I think redirecting STDERR is probably the cleanest kludge with respect to the error generated while compiling the reval code. The warning can be squelched through normal means, since it's occurring outside of the reval. –  DavidO Jul 26 '12 at 21:25
    
The first solution proposed by @amon is working in the following code: use strict; use warnings; use Safe; use feature qw/say/; my $cft = Safe->new; { local $SIG{WARN} = sub {}; my $x = $cft->reval( ') 1' ); my $y = $cft->reval( '2' ); say "x: $x"; say "y: $y"; } This seems to be exactly what I was looking for, thanks! –  andrefs Jul 26 '12 at 21:38
    
@andrefs If this answer worked for you, please "accept" this answer to mark your question as "closed". –  amon Jul 26 '12 at 21:48
    
Marked @Schwern's solution as accepted because it answers better to the original question -- how to silence warnings inside reval -- and refers to yours for how to silence other errors as well. –  andrefs Jul 26 '12 at 21:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.