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I was wondering would there be a performance differences while i use logical operators instead of several if statements. I saw a nice link, does this apply to java also?

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2  
do you mean: if(a) if(b) if(c) d(); versus if(a && b && c) d();? –  Ryan Amos Jul 26 '12 at 20:45
    
I kind of doubt that it does, but there are serveral byte code inspection tools for java if you're really curious. You can also write a really big loop and compare the performance. –  Robert Jul 26 '12 at 20:47
3  
I would assume it would be negligible, if it existed at all, but why don't you test it? –  Steve B. Jul 26 '12 at 20:47
2  
The article you posted gives an excellent example of how to test this. Just stick a timer on it and compare the speeds. –  Ryan Amos Jul 26 '12 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I just created class like

class Test{
    static java.util.Random r=new java.util.Random();
    boolean test(){
        return r.nextBoolean();
    }
    void test1(){
        if (test() && test() && test())
            System.out.println("3x yes");
    }
    void test2(){
        if (test())
            if (test()) 
                if (test())
                    System.out.println("3x yes");
    }
}

compiled it then decompiled by javap -c Test and got these result

class Test {
  static java.util.Random r;

  Test();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":
()V
       4: return

  boolean test();
    Code:
       0: getstatic     #2                  // Field r:Ljava/util/Random;
       3: invokevirtual #3                  // Method java/util/Random.nextBoole
an:()Z
       6: ireturn

  void test1();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
       4: ifeq          29
       7: aload_0
       8: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
      11: ifeq          29
      14: aload_0
      15: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
      18: ifeq          29
      21: getstatic     #5                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/
io/PrintStream;
      24: ldc           #6                  // String 3x yes
      26: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.printl
n:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      29: return

  void test2();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
       4: ifeq          29
       7: aload_0
       8: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
      11: ifeq          29
      14: aload_0
      15: invokevirtual #4                  // Method test:()Z
      18: ifeq          29
      21: getstatic     #5                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/
io/PrintStream;
      24: ldc           #6                  // String 3x yes
      26: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.printl
n:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      29: return

  static {};
    Code:
       0: new           #8                  // class java/util/Random
       3: dup
       4: invokespecial #9                  // Method java/util/Random."<init>":
()V
       7: putstatic     #2                  // Field r:Ljava/util/Random;
      10: return
}

So as you can see bytecodes of test1 and test2 are similar so there is no difference in using

    if (test() && test() && test())

or

    if (test())
        if (test()) 
            if (test())
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It means that the two ways of writing the code compile to the same bytecode. There is no optimization involved. There's just no other sensible way to compile &&. –  EJP Jul 27 '12 at 1:34
    
Yes you are right. Corrected my answer also +1 for you. –  Pshemo Jul 27 '12 at 1:47

It's implementation dependent - so you'll need to benchmark to be sure.

Having said that, most JIT compilers are smart enough to optimise boolean comparisons very effectively so you are unlikely to see any difference.

The only area where logical operators are likely to offer a substantial advantage are in cases where you are using them to perform bitwise computations. This can be very efficient since it can result in branchless code that exploits hardware instructions.

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How is it implementation dependent? And logical operators are not bitwise operators: these are just two different things. –  EJP Jul 27 '12 at 1:38
    
It's implementation dependent because the Java compiler and/or JIT compiler may or may not choose to optimise these down to the most efficient bytecode / machine code respectively. You have no guarantees. And it may be a matter of definitions but bitwise operations are just logical operations applied to bit vectors rather than booleans, so it's common to consider them as similar. –  mikera Jul 27 '12 at 2:10
    
Really. How else can you compile &&? And bitwise operators are completely different beasts, as they don't short-circuit. Which is what the question is about, so they aren't even relevant. –  EJP Jul 27 '12 at 2:15
    
The question isn't about short-circuiting operators specifically. But even if it was, then a bitwise op is the efficient way to compile && in any situation where the left hand argument is available in a local variable or register, since it's faster to do a bitwise op with a local value than to put in an extra branch. The only case where you need a branch with a short-circuiting operator is when there are side effects, in all other cases the compiler is free to decide whether or not it would be faster to evaluate the left hand side anyway and use a bitwise op (it produces the same result) –  mikera Jul 27 '12 at 2:21
    
So that we can all agree please tell us which Java compilers behave as you describe. –  EJP Jul 27 '12 at 22:55

Both forms compile to the same code. Contrary to the suggestions in other answers, this is not an 'optimization', and it would be astonishing if different compilers did different things. There is only one sensible way to compile && and that is by treating it the same as another 'if'. I can't even think of a non-sensible way.

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Prepare then to be astonished then - different compilers do wildly different things even in supposedly "simple" cases. Also an extra if branch would often be an inefficient way to compile a logical operator - these can be more efficiently implemented with a bitwise instruction in many situations because the branch mis-prediction penalty is much higher than the cost of a bitwise op. –  mikera Jul 27 '12 at 2:16

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