Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I met a weird issue. please see the code I paste below. in myclass I have a @property datef. I can set get the property; but when I make myclass inherit from mybase, I cannot set the property any more. Why?

class mybase(object):
    pass

class myclass(mybase):
    @property     
    def dataf(self): return 1

var = myclass()
print var.dataf
var.dataf = 33
print var.__dict__
share|improve this question
4  
I don't get what you mean. You don't define a setter method for the property. –  Joel Cornett Jul 26 '12 at 21:55
    
Isn't it because mybase inherits from object? This changes the way properties work. –  blob8108 Jul 26 '12 at 21:58
    
Why are you trying to override the property's value? Doesn't this kinda defeat the point of a property? –  blob8108 Jul 26 '12 at 21:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to define property getter and setter:

class mybase(object):
    pass

class myclass(mybase):
    def dataf_get(self): return getattr(self, "_data_f", None)
    def dataf_set(self, value): self._data_f = value
    dataf = property(dataf_get, dataf_set)

var = myclass()
print var.dataf
>> None
var.dataf = 33
print var.dataf
>> 33
print var.__dict__
>> {'_data_f': 33}
share|improve this answer
    
Alternate syntax: decorator for setter is @dataf.setter (new in 2.6) –  Lenna Jul 26 '12 at 22:04

The @property decorator only works properly with new-style classes.

If you tried

class myclass:
    @property     
    def dataf(self): return 1

then myclass is an old-style class, so don't expect @property to work properly.

When instead you make myclass a subclass of mybase which in turn inherits from object, you are making myclass a new-style class. Now @property works properly.

Now you need to define a setter if you wish to be able to set the property.

class mybase(object):
    pass

class myclass(mybase):
    @property     
    def dataf(self): return 1

    @dataf.setter
    def dataf(self, value):
        self._dataf = value

var = myclass()
print var.dataf
var.dataf = 33
print var.__dict__

yields

1
{'_dataf': 33}
share|improve this answer
    
The code shown is a new-style class. –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 22:05
2  
@Marcin: No, I think this is correct. The only explanation for the OP being able to "set" the property without a setter is that the original class was old-style, i.e. the property decorator was ignored and the class attribute dataf was being reassigned to 33. –  Lenna Jul 26 '12 at 22:07
1  
@Marcin: The OP states, "but when I make myclass inherent [sic] from mybase, I cannot set the property any more." This implies that he first tried making myclass NOT inherit from mybase. Since he was able to set the property, it must have been because myclass was no longer a new-style class. –  unutbu Jul 26 '12 at 22:07
    
@Marcin: I am new turn python from C#. the property doesn't make sense for me. for example you have a class - myclass has a public field - dataf, later on you want to change the dataf's logic, not just return the data, you want put some logic before return, so you need change dataf to function, but you don't want to change ever place where you are using the public field. but in python, after you set the field - dataf = 33, the get function won't be execute any more ( return 1 ) –  alex Jul 27 '12 at 13:49
    
@alex: Actually, even after you set var.dataf = 33, the next time you access var.dataf the getter function will be called (and it will return 1). If this is not clear, post runnable code, with the output you are getting and the output you desire. –  unutbu Jul 27 '12 at 17:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.