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I'm attempting to convert my program from GLfloat to GLshort for vertex positions and I'm not sure how to represent this in the shader. I was using a vec3 datatype in the shader but vec3 represents 3 floats. Now I need to represent 3 shorts. As far as I can tell OpenGL doesn't have a vector for shorts so what am I supposed to do in this case?

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I'm not sure how to represent this in the shader.

That's because this information doesn't live in the shader.

All values provided by glVertexAttribPointer will be converted to floating-point GLSL values (if they're not floats already). This conversion is essentially free. So you can use any of these glVertexAttribPointer definitions with a vec4 attribute type:

glVertexAttribPointer(0, 4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, ...);
glVertexAttribPointer(0, 4, GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, GL_TRUE, ...);
glVertexAttribPointer(0, 4, GL_SHORT, GL_TRUE, ...);
glVertexAttribPointer(0, 4, GL_SHORT, GL_FALSE, ...);

All of these will be converted into a vec4 automatically. Your shader doesn't have to know or care that it's being fed shorts, bytes, integers, floats, etc.

The first one will be used as is. The second one will convert the unsigned short range [0, 65535] to the [0.0, 1.0] floating-point range. The third will convert the signed short range [-32768, 32767] to the [-1.0, 1.0] range. The fourth will convert [-32768, 32767] to [-32768.0, 32767.0], as a floating-point range.

The GLSL type you use for attributes only changes if you use glVertexAttribIPointer or glVertexAttribLPointer, neither of which is available in OpenGL ES.

In short: you should always use float GLSL types for attributes. OpenGL will do the conversion for you.

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I was under the impression I could after reading the answers at: stackoverflow.com/a/1316494/256062 and stackoverflow.com/a/5721102/256062 –  Xavier Jul 26 '12 at 22:41
    
@Xavier: You're missing the point. The size of your vertex data is defined by glVertexAttribPointer, not the GLSL attribute variable. You don't need to represent smaller components in the shader; the hardware will convert from smaller components to larger ones. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 26 '12 at 23:09
    
@nicol-bolas For signed data types, are you sure the converted range is for example (for short) [-32768, 32767] and not [-32767, 32767] ? This article, supposedly taken from the Orange Book, seems to teach differently. It says the conversion is just a division for signed types. In that case, the short value -32768 would be converted to floating-point GLSL value -32768 / 32767 = -1.000305185.. . I cannot find in the spec where to determine which is correct. –  wil Apr 18 at 6:06

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