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I am trying to speed up a query on a large table with WHERE clauses on two columns, as far as I can, MySQL is only using the ALERT_ID column.

Is there a way to rewrite this query using both indices?

SHOW_INDEX and EXPLAIN output is below.

show index from alert_hit;

+-----------+------------+-------------------+--------------+-------------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+
| Table     | Non_unique | Key_name          | Seq_in_index | Column_name       | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment | Index_comment |
+-----------+------------+-------------------+--------------+-------------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+
| alert_hit |          0 | PRIMARY           |            1 | id                | A         |    15181402 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | alert_id          |            1 | alert_id          | A         |          20 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | timestamp         |            1 | timestamp         | A         |      446511 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | data_source_id    |            1 | data_source_id    | A         |          20 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | filter_syndicated |            1 | filter_syndicated | A         |          20 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | unique_id         |            1 | unique_id         | A         |     5060467 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | date_created      |            1 | date_created      | A         |      281137 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | language          |            1 | language          | A         |          20 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | region            |            1 | region            | A         |       42406 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
| alert_hit |          1 | market_rank       |            1 | market_rank       | A         |          20 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
+-----------+------------+-------------------+--------------+-------------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+

explain select count(id) as history FROM alert_hit force index(alert_id, timestamp) where alert_id in (9045,9046,9047,9048,9049,9050,9051,9052,9330,9332)  AND timestamp between DATE_SUB( NOW(), INTERVAL 1*2 day) and DATE_SUB( NOW(), INTERVAL 1 day);
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+--------------------+----------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type  | possible_keys      | key      | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+--------------------+----------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | alert_hit | range | alert_id,timestamp | alert_id | 5       | NULL | 99578 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+--------------------+----------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
share|improve this question
2  
I think MySQL queries can only use one index per table. Maybe try making another index using both colummns... – Aerik Jul 26 '12 at 22:51
    
Or, create a covering index on (alert_id,timestamp,id) which contains ALL the columns referenced in the query (with the columns referenced in the WHERE clause first.) Look for 'Using index' in the extra column of the EXPLAIN output to see if the query is satisfied from the index without referencing the data pages. – spencer7593 Jul 26 '12 at 23:13
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to have one index on both fields

ALTER TABLE alert_hit ADD INDEX `IDX-alert_id-timestamp` (`alert_id`, `timestamp`);

Also MySQL will use the multi column index up to the first field for which there is a range condition in the WHERE clause, so in this case order matters and timestamp should be last in the index.

As suggested by @spencer7593 selecting COUNT(1) instead of count(id) might also be better.

share|improve this answer
    
You might want to include the id column in the index as well; that will allow the query to be satisfied 'Using index', without referencing the data pages. Alternatively, if we know id is not null, change the query to SELECT COUNT(1) FROM ..., and MySQL can use the index on (alert_id,timestamp) as a covering index. – spencer7593 Jul 26 '12 at 23:19
    
That would be redundant in InnoDB (it is already at the end of the index), if it is MyISAM you can do COUNT(*) and get 'Using index'. – Vatev Jul 26 '12 at 23:24
    
Yes, redundant. But the index on (alert_id,timestamp) is not a covering index for the OP query for InnoDB under MySQL 5.1.38. (It is a covering index for a SELECT COUNT(1). I also tested with InnoDB under MySQL 5.5.25, and that index IS a covering index for the OP query, without the (redundant) addition of the id column. on MySQL 5.1 InnoDB, the performance advantage of the covering indexes outweighs the cost of the "redundant" PK column included in the index. The OP does not appear to be concerned with storing "redundant" PK column, given the nine secondary indexes. – spencer7593 Jul 26 '12 at 23:43

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