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Is there anyway to check if an enum exists by comparing it to a given string? I can't seem to find any such function. I could just try to use the valueOf method and catch an exception but I'v been taught that catching runtime exceptions is not good practice. Anybody have any ideas?

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4  
I really don't understand the idea behind emum valueOf throwing an exception... it does not make any sense. It would be a lot more practical in every aspect if it would just return NULL. –  marcolopes Feb 6 '13 at 8:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I don't think there's a built-in way to do it without catching exceptions. You could instead use something like this:

public static MyEnum asMyEnum(String str) {
    for (MyEnum me : MyEnum.values()) {
        if (me.name().equalsIgnoreCase(str))
            return me;
    }
    return null;
}

Edit: As Jon Skeet notes, values() works by cloning a private backing array every time it is called. If performance is critical, you may want to call values() only once, cache the array, and iterate through that.

Also, if your enum has a huge number of values, Jon Skeet's map alternative is likely to perform better than any array iteration.

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I figured I would have to do something like that. Thanks! –  Danny Jul 22 '09 at 20:21

If I need to do this, I sometimes build a Set<String> of the names, or even my own Map<String,MyEnum> - then you can just check that.

A couple of points worth noting:

  • Populate any such static collection in a static initializer. Don't use a variable initializer and then rely on it having been executed when the enum constructor runs - it won't have been! (The enum constructors are the first things to be executed, before the static initializer.)
  • Try to avoid using values() frequently - it has to create and populate a new array each time. To iterate over all elements, use EnumSet.allOf which is much more efficient for enums without a large number of elements.

Sample code:

import java.util.*;

enum SampleEnum {
    Foo,
    Bar;

    private static final Map<String, SampleEnum> nameToValueMap =
        new HashMap<String, SampleEnum>();

    static {
        for (SampleEnum value : EnumSet.allOf(SampleEnum.class)) {
            nameToValueMap.put(value.name(), value);
        }
    }

    public static SampleEnum forName(String name) {
        return nameToValueMap.get(name);
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args)
        throws Exception { // Just for simplicity!
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Foo"));
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Bar"));
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Baz"));
    }
}

Of course, if you only have a few names this is probably overkill - an O(n) solution often wins over an O(1) solution when n is small enough. Here's another approach:

import java.util.*;

enum SampleEnum {
    Foo,
    Bar;

    // We know we'll never mutate this, so we can keep
    // a local copy.
    private static final SampleEnum[] copyOfValues = values();

    public static SampleEnum forName(String name) {
        for (SampleEnum value : copyOfValues) {
            if (value.name().equals(name)) {
                return value;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args)
        throws Exception { // Just for simplicity!
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Foo"));
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Bar"));
        System.out.println(SampleEnum.forName("Baz"));
    }
}
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values() creates and populates a new array? I don't remember hearing that before, but presumably you have a source? –  Michael Myers Jul 22 '09 at 20:27
3  
Well it returns an array... and it can't protect you from mutating that array... and it wouldn't subsequent callers to be hampered by that. Other than that, look at the JRE sources :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 22 '09 at 20:29
    
It's not in the JRE sources, that's why I asked. But I hadn't thought of the mutation aspect; you're probably right, then. –  Michael Myers Jul 22 '09 at 20:31
    
Oops, sorry - yes, just checked myself. Decompile an enum then :) It uses clone() which may be pretty quick, but not as quick as not having to do it at all... –  Jon Skeet Jul 22 '09 at 20:32
    
Ah, the question of how values() works was asked and answered within the last day: stackoverflow.com/questions/1163076/…. –  Michael Myers Jul 22 '09 at 20:33

Based on Jon Skeet answer i've made a class that permits to do it easily at work:

import com.google.common.collect.ImmutableMap;
import com.google.common.collect.Maps;

import java.util.EnumSet;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

/**
 * <p>
 * This permits to easily implement a failsafe implementation of the enums's valueOf
 * Better use it inside the enum so that only one of this object instance exist for each enum...
 * (a cache could solve this if needed)
 * </p>
 *
 * <p>
 * Basic usage exemple on an enum class called MyEnum:
 *
 *   private static final FailSafeValueOf<MyEnum> FAIL_SAFE = FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class);
 *   public static MyEnum failSafeValueOf(String enumName) {
 *       return FAIL_SAFE.valueOf(enumName);
 *   }
 *
 * </p>
 *
 * <p>
 * You can also use it outside of the enum this way:
 *   FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class).valueOf("EnumName");
 * </p>
 *
 * @author Sebastien Lorber <i>(lorber.sebastien@gmail.com)</i>
 */
public class FailSafeValueOf<T extends Enum<T>> {

    private final Map<String,T> nameToEnumMap;

    private FailSafeValueOf(Class<T> enumClass) {
        Map<String,T> map = Maps.newHashMap();
        for ( T value : EnumSet.allOf(enumClass)) {
            map.put( value.name() , value);
        }
        nameToEnumMap = ImmutableMap.copyOf(map);
    }

    /**
     * Returns the value of the given enum element
     * If the 
     * @param enumName
     * @return
     */
    public T valueOf(String enumName) {
        return nameToEnumMap.get(enumName);
    }

    public static <U extends Enum<U>> FailSafeValueOf<U> create(Class<U> enumClass) {
        return new FailSafeValueOf<U>(enumClass);
    }

}

And the unit test:

import org.testng.annotations.Test;

import static org.testng.Assert.*;


/**
 * @author Sebastien Lorber <i>(lorber.sebastien@gmail.com)</i>
 */
public class FailSafeValueOfTest {

    private enum MyEnum {
        TOTO,
        TATA,
        ;

        private static final FailSafeValueOf<MyEnum> FAIL_SAFE = FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class);
        public static MyEnum failSafeValueOf(String enumName) {
            return FAIL_SAFE.valueOf(enumName);
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void testInEnum() {
        assertNotNull( MyEnum.failSafeValueOf("TOTO") );
        assertNotNull( MyEnum.failSafeValueOf("TATA") );
        assertNull( MyEnum.failSafeValueOf("TITI") );
    }

    @Test
    public void testInApp() {
        assertNotNull( FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class).valueOf("TOTO") );
        assertNotNull( FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class).valueOf("TATA") );
        assertNull( FailSafeValueOf.create(MyEnum.class).valueOf("TITI") );
    }

}

Notice that i used Guava to make an ImmutableMap but actually you could use a normal map i think since the map is never returned...

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One of my favorite lib: Apache Commons.

The EnumUtils can do that easily.

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I don't know why anyone told you that catching runtime exceptions was bad.

Use valueOf and catching IllegalArgumentException is fine for converting/checking a string to an enum.

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13  
No it's not, IMO. That's testing a non-exceptional situation via exceptions - using them for flow control in a normal, non-error condition. That's a very poor use of exceptions IMO, and one which can have a significant performance impact. Exceptions are fine in terms of performance normally, because they shouldn't happen - but when you use them for non-error conditions, then code which looks like it should run quickly can get bogged down. –  Jon Skeet Jul 22 '09 at 20:56

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