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Is there a way to std::bind to a std::weak_ptr? I'd like to store a "weak function" callback that automatically "disconnects" when the callee is destroyed.

I know how to create a std::function using a shared_ptr:

std::function<void()> MyClass::GetCallback()
{
    return std::function<void()>(std::bind(&MyClass::CallbackFunc, shared_from_this()));
}

However the returned std::function keeps my object alive forever. So I'd like to bind it to a weak_ptr:

std::function<void()> MyClass::GetCallback()
{
    std::weak_ptr<MyClass> thisWeakPtr(shared_from_this());
    return std::function<void()>(std::bind(&MyClass::CallbackFunc, thisWeakPtr));
}

But that doesn't compile. (std::bind will accept no weak_ptr!) Is there any way to bind to a weak_ptr?

I've found discussions about this (see below), but there seems to be no standard implementation. What is the best solution for storing a "weak function", in particular if Boost is not available?


Discussions / research (all of these use Boost and are not standardized):

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2  
Perhaps a signal library (like Boost.Signals2) would fit your needs. –  Luc Danton Jul 27 '12 at 3:27
    
@LucDanton: Hmm, yes, you're right. If that's the case, does there still exist any use case for a weak_fn? –  Scotty Jul 27 '12 at 3:45
    
Did you try using the weak_ptr constructor that takes a shared_ptr? –  Tim Finer Jul 29 '12 at 8:25
    
@TimFiner: I know how to create a weak_ptr from a shared_ptr. :) The issue is that the std::function constructor can't take a weak_ptr. –  Scotty Jul 30 '12 at 1:28

4 Answers 4

std::weak_ptr<MyClass> thisWeakPtr(shared_from_this());
return std::function<void()>(std::bind(&MyClass::CallbackFunc, thisWeakPtr));

You should never do this. Ever.

MyClass::CallbackFunc is a non-static member function of the class MyClass. Being a non-static member function, it must be called with a valid instance of MyClass.

The entire point of weak_ptr is that it isn't necessarily valid. You can detect its validity by transforming it into a shared_ptr and then testing if the pointer is NULL. Since weak_ptr is not guaranteed to be valid at all times, you cannot call a non-static member function with one.

What you're doing is no more valid than:

std::bind(&MyClass::CallbackFunc, nullptr)

It may compiled, but it will eventually crash when you try to call it.

Your best bet is to use actual logic, to not call the callback function if the weak_ptr is not valid. bind is not designed to do logic; it just does exactly what you tell it to: call the function. So you need to use a proper lambda:

std::weak_ptr<MyClass> thisWeakPtr(shared_from_this());
return std::function<void()>([thisWeakPtr]()
{
  std::shared_ptr<MyClass> myPtr(thisWeakPtr);
  if(myPtr)
    myPtr->CallbackFunc()
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, a lambda is the conclusion that I came to. For the record, bind() with a weak_ptr does not compile (at least on MSVC), as I stated in the OP. Is is possible to make this lambda generic (templated) so that I don't need to write a custom lambda for every weak_ptr? –  Scotty Sep 4 '12 at 0:39
    
@Scotty: It doesn't need to be a lambda specifically. It just needs to be a functor. Such a function object can be a template if you so desire. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 4 '12 at 0:43
    
Sure. Would you like to provide an template example so that other people can benefit? :) I'd like to accept this answer but I feel like the "You should never do this" part is misleading, because binding to a weak_ptr can't be done - it's not a question of "should". Just the lambda (preferably templated) is enough to answer this. –  Scotty Sep 4 '12 at 6:59

I was able to create weak_pointers of std::function and tested it with clang-3.2 (you didn't give any compiler restrictions).

Here's a sample app that creates and tests what I believe you are asking for:

#include <functional>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

typedef std::function<void(void)> Func;
typedef std::shared_ptr<Func> SharedFunc;
typedef std::weak_ptr<Func> WeakFunc;


void Execute( Func f ) {
    f();
}


void Execute( SharedFunc sf ) {
    (*sf)();
}


void Execute( WeakFunc wf ) {
    if ( auto f = wf.lock() )
        (*f)();
    else
        std::cout << "Your backing pointer went away, sorry.\n";
}

int main(int, char**) {

    auto f1 = [](){ std::cout << "Func here.\n"; };
    Execute( f1 );

    auto f2 = [](){ std::cout << "SharedFunc here.\n"; };
    SharedFunc sf2( new Func(f2) );
    Execute( sf2 );

    auto f3 = [](){ std::cout << "WeakFunc here.\n"; };
    SharedFunc sf3( new Func(f3) );
    WeakFunc wf3( sf3 );
    Execute( wf3 );

    // Scoped test to make sure that the weak_ptr is really working.
    WeakFunc wf4;
    {
        auto f4 = [](){ std::cout << "You should never see this.\n"; };
        SharedFunc sf4( new Func(f4) );
        wf4 = sf4;
    }
    Execute( wf4 );

    return 0;
}

The output was:

~/projects/stack_overflow> clang++-mp-3.2 --std=c++11 --stdlib=libc++ weak_fun.cpp -o wf && ./wf
Func here.
SharedFunc here.
WeakFunc here.
Your backing pointer went away, sorry.
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm trying to pass a weak_ptr to std::function's constructor, not store a std::function in a shared_ptr/weak_ptr. I'm editing the question to make this more clear. Thanks for your answer though. :) –  Scotty Jul 31 '12 at 1:48
    
You're welcome. Sorry I'm not getting what your asking still. There isn't a constructor for a std::function, so I'm really confused what you mean by a std::function's constructor. You can define what arguments a std::function takes and what it returns and there is no restriction on what those are AFAIK. –  Tim Finer Jul 31 '12 at 5:46
    
Sorry it wasn't clear - I've added examples to show what I mean. I need to bind using a weak_ptr, then pass that into std::function's constructor. –  Scotty Jul 31 '12 at 6:07

Not sure why that definition is not in boost. There must be a good reason (how to deal with lock fail? Is throwing from there acceptable? Thread safety?) Anyway, that will validate your callee.

namespace boost {

template<class T> T * get_pointer(boost::weak_ptr<T> const& p)
{
  boost::shared_ptr< T > _strong = p.lock();
  if( _strong )
   return _strong.get();
  else
    throw 1;
}

}

int main(int arg, char *argv[])
{
  boost::weak_ptr< MyType > weak_bad;
  {
    boost::shared_ptr< MyType > strong(new MyType);
    boost::weak_ptr< MyType > weak(strong);
    boost::function< void(int) > _func1 = boost::bind(&MyType::setX, weak, _1);
    _func1(10);
    weak_bad = strong;
  }

  try {
    boost::function< void(int) > _func1 = boost::bind(&MyType::setX, weak_bad, _1);
    _func1(10);
  }
  catch(...)
  {
    std::cout << "oops!";
  }

  return 0;
};

Another solution:

You could wrap the std::function. The class producing the callback would hold a shared_ptr< wrapper_type > and provide a weak_ptr< wrapper_type >. The producing object would be the one with the ownership, if it goes out of scope, callers won't be able to promote their weak reference. Your wrapper type could forward call arguments to the std::function or simply expose it via its interface. Just make sure that on copy you properly handle the shared_ptr on the wrapper (don't share).

template< typename _Ty >
struct wrapper
{
  wrapper(_Ty wrappe) 
    : _wrappe(wrappe)
  { }

  _Ty _wrappe;
};

...
boost::shared_ptr< wrapper < std::func< ... > > _func(new wrapper < std::func< ... > );

...
boost::weak_ptr< wrapper < std::func< ... > getCallBack() {
  return _func;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thinking about this a bit more...might not be thread safe...as after that get_pointer call nothing is holding the reference. –  regu Sep 1 '12 at 20:46
    
The wrapper solution also requires thread safety considerations... –  regu Sep 1 '12 at 20:59

How about this? it works only for actions std::function<void()> but perhaps it can be generalized for arbitrarily parameterized functions.

#include <memory>
#include <functional>

template<typename T>
void 
perform_action_or_ignore_when_null(
    std::weak_ptr<T> weak, 
    std::function< void( std::shared_ptr<T> ) > func
    )
{
    if(auto ptr = weak.lock())
        func(ptr);
}

template<typename T>
std::function<void()> 
ignore_when_null(
    std::weak_ptr<T> weak, 
    std::function< void( std::shared_ptr<T> ) > func
    )
{
    return std::bind(perform_action_or_ignore_when_null<T>, weak, func);
}

here's an example usage:

struct Foo {
    Foo() {}
    void bar() { 
        std::cout << "hello world!" << std::endl;
    }
};

void main()
{
  std::weak_ptr<Foo> weakfoo;
  std::function<void(std::shared_ptr<Foo>)> foobar = std::bind(&Foo::bar, std::placeholders::_1);
  {
     auto foo = std::make_shared<Foo>();
     weakfoo  = foo;

     auto f = ignore_when_null(weakfoo, foobar);
     f(); // prints "hello world!";
   }

   auto g = ignore_when_null(weakfoo, foobar);
   g(); // does nothing
}
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