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I have a main task that is spawning threads to do some work. When the work is completed it will write to the console.

My problem is that some of the threads that are created later will finish faster than those created earlier. However I need the writing to the console to be done in the same exact sequence as the thread was created.

So if a thread had completed its task, while some earlier threads had not, it has to wait till those earlier threads complete too.

    public class DoRead
    {
        public DoRead()
        {
        }

        private void StartReading()
        {
            int i = 1;

            while (i < 10000)
            {
                Runner r = new Runner(i, "Work" + i.ToString());
                r.StartThread();
                i += 1;
            }
        }
    }

    internal class Runner : System.IDisposable
    {
        int _count;
        string _work = "";

        public Runner(int Count, string Work)
        {
            _count = Count;
            _work = Work;
        }

        public void StartThread()
        {
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(runThreadInPool), this);
        }

        public static void runThreadInPool(object obj)
        {
            ((Runner)obj).run();
        }

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                Random r = new Random();
                int num = r.Next(1000, 2000);

                DateTime end = DateTime.Now.AddMilliseconds(num);
                while (end > DateTime.Now)
                {
                }

                Console.WriteLine(_count.ToString() + " : Done!");
            }
            catch
            {
            }
            finally
            {
                 _work = null;
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
             this._work = null;
        }

    }
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Are you able to use .net 4.0 ? I ask, since the syntax would be cleaner. –  Xantix Jul 27 '12 at 3:00
    
Unfortunately I am limited to .net 2.0 –  darren chia Jul 27 '12 at 3:05
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3 Answers

There may be a simpler way to do this than I used, (I'm used to .Net 4.0).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
    class Program
    {
        public static readonly int numOfTasks = 100;

        public static int numTasksLeft = numOfTasks;

        public static readonly object TaskDecrementLock = new object();

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            DoRead dr = new DoRead();

            dr.StartReading();

            int tmpNumTasks = numTasksLeft;

            while ( tmpNumTasks > 0 )
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                tmpNumTasks = numTasksLeft;
            }


            List<string> strings = new List<string>();

            lock( DoRead.locker )
            {
                for (int i = 1; i <= Program.numOfTasks; i++)
                {
                    strings.Add( DoRead.dicto[i] );
                }
            }

            foreach (string s in strings)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(s);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public class DoRead
        {

            public static readonly object locker = new object();

            public static Dictionary<int, string> dicto = new Dictionary<int, string>();

            public DoRead()
            {
            }

            public void StartReading()
            {
                int i = 1;

                while (i <= Program.numOfTasks )
                {
                    Runner r = new Runner(i, "Work" + i.ToString());
                    r.StartThread();
                    i += 1;
                }


            }
        }

        internal class Runner : System.IDisposable
        {
            int _count;
            string _work = "";

            public Runner(int Count, string Work)
            {
                _count = Count;
                _work = Work;
            }

            public void StartThread()
            {
                ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(runThreadInPool), this);
            }

            public static void runThreadInPool(object obj)
            {
                Runner theRunner = ((Runner)obj);
                string theString = theRunner.run();

                lock (DoRead.locker)
                {
                    DoRead.dicto.Add( theRunner._count, theString);
                }

                lock (Program.TaskDecrementLock)
                {
                    Program.numTasksLeft--;
                }
            }

            public string run()
            {
                try
                {
                    Random r = new Random();
                    int num = r.Next(1000, 2000);

                    Thread.Sleep(num);

                    string theString = _count.ToString() + " : Done!";

                    return theString;

                }
                catch
                {
                }
                finally
                {
                    _work = null;
                }

                return "";
            }

            public void Dispose()
            {
                this._work = null;
            }

        }
    }
}

Basically, I store the string you want printed from each task into a dictionary where the index is the task#. (I use a lock to make accessing the dictionary safe).

Next, so that the main program waits until all the background threads are done, I used another locked access to a NumTasksLeft variable.

I added stuff into the callback for the Runner.

It is bad practice to use busy loops, so I changed it to a Thread.Sleep( num ) statement.

Just change numOfTasks to 10000 to match your example.

I pull the return strings out of the dictionary in order, and then print it to the screen.

I'm sure you could refactor this to move or otherwise deal with the global variables, but this works.

Also, you might have noticed I didn't use the lock in the command

 tmpNumTasks = numTasksLeft;

That's threadsafe, since numTasksLeft is an int which is read atomically on 32-bit computers and higher.

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I don't know much on C#, but the whole idea of multi-threading is that you have multiple thread executing independently and you can never know which one will finish earlier (and you shouldn't expect earlier thread to end earlier).

One workaround is, instead writing out the finish message in the processing thread, have the processing thread setup a flag somewhere (probably a list with no of elements = no of thread spawned), and have a separate thread print out the finish message base on the flags in that list, and report up to the position that previous flag is consecutively "finished".

Honestly I don't feel that reasonable for you to print finish message like this anyway. I think changing the design is way better to have such meaningless "feature".

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Typically, such requirements are met with an incrementing sequence number, much as you have already done.

Usually, the output from the processing threads is fed through a filter object that contains a list, (or dictionary), of all out-of-order result objects, 'holding them back' until all results with a lower seqeuence-number have come in. Again, similar to what you have already done.

What is not necessary is any kind of sleep() loop. The work threads themselves can operate the filter object, (which would beed a lock), or the work threads can producer-consumer-queue the results to an 'output thread' that operates the out-of-order filter.

This scheme works fine with pooled work threads, ie. those without continual create/terminate/destroy overhead.

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