Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a environment config file where i have defined the environment variables. I use source to get these variables inside my shell script(bash).

I use a checkout command in my shell script which checks out the files from location defined in an environment variable. Now i need to use multiple locations to checkout the files which can be any number for different run of shell script.

For eg. User gives two paths, PATH1 and PATH2 in config file and a NUM_OF_PATHS as 2.

In my shell script I want to do something like below for using path.

i=0
echo ${NUM_OF_PATHS}
while [ $i -lt ${NUM_OF_PATHS} ]
do
    checkout $PATH{$i}
    i=`expr $i + 1`
done

How can I use the variable i to form an environment variable PATH1 or PATH2 etc.?

share|improve this question
    
${PATH$i} .... –  Chris Dodd Jul 27 '12 at 4:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
i=1
while [ $i -le ${NUM_OF_PATHS} ]
do
  CPATH=$(eval echo \$\{PATH$i\})
  echo "PATH$i: $CPATH"
  let i++ 
done

eval combines and evaluates its parameters and executes the combined expression. Here, eval executes: echo ${PATH1}. In order to do this, we first escape the ${...} so that echo can receive them after eval. The only un-escaped special character is $ before i. eval expands this and strips off the escaped characters and executes echo with the result.

So, CPATH=$(eval echo \$\{PATH$i\}) becomes CPATH=$(echo ${PATH1}) and CPATH gets the echo output.

share|improve this answer
    
It worked. Can you please explain what are you doing here? –  Anuj Jul 27 '12 at 4:32
    
@Anuj, updated the answer –  perreal Jul 27 '12 at 4:46

Here is a complete example that I think will do what you want. Below is my original message that was voted down for a reason I don't completely understand:

$ cat test.sh
function checkout() {
    echo "Registering $1"
}

PATH1="Path1;/usr/bin"
PATH2="Path2;/bin"
NUM_OF_PATHS=2

i=1
echo $NUM_OF_PATHS
while [ $i -le $NUM_OF_PATHS ]
do
    eval "checkout \$PATH$i"
    i=`expr $i + 1`
done
$ bash test.sh
2
Registering Path1;/usr/bin
Registering Path2;/bin
$

Original Message You can use the "eval" command. Here is an example (works on GNU bash, version 4.2.37(2)-release):

$ A1="Variable 1"
$ A2="Variable 2"
$ for i in {1..2}; do eval "echo \$A$i"; done
Variable 1
Variable 2
$

The string will evaluate to "echo $A1" and "echo $A2", and then eval will do what you want.

share|improve this answer

Why don't you use array variable? Use one array MYPATH[] instead multi PATH1 PATH2 variables

MYPATH=(
path0
path1
path2
)
MYPATH[3]=path3

NUM_OF_PATHS="${#MYPATH[@]}"
echo ${NUM_OF_PATHS}

for ((i=0; i < NUM_OF_PATHS; i++))
do
    checkout ${MYPATH[$i]}
done
share|improve this answer

Use curly braces around the name: ${PATH$i}

share|improve this answer
    
It is not working. I tried all combinations with curly braces. It gives bad substitution error. –  Anuj Jul 27 '12 at 4:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.