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I have a Picture class and I want to override returning the "description" database column value depending on some logic.

Is this valid in Rails? Can I always rely on the Class to call the class method before returning the database column value?

# database columns for Picture class
# description => String
# parent_id => Integer

class Picture < ActiveRecord::Base

  def description
    if parent_id.nil?
      self.description      
    else
      description = Picture.find(parent_id).description
    end
  end

end 

Couldn't figure out where to find the answer in the Rails source code so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!

EDIT

I'm trying to return a Picture's description depending on whether or not it's a child or parent Picture (they can be nested). The example is a bit contrived...I could easily avoid this by using a method without the same name as the database column...such as

def my_description
   if parent_id.nil? # return db data since no parent
      self.description
   else # return parent's description if one exists
      description = Picture.find(parent_id).description
   end
end

I guess I'm trying to be unnecessarily complicated here

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not totally clear what you're trying to do, but you can use super to get the description value from within the method:

def description
  if parent_id.nil?
    super
  else
    self.description = Picture.find(parent_id).description
  end
end

Note that I changed the last line to use self.description = because I'm assuming you want to set the description value. If that's not the case, then you don't need to assign it to any variable.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to return a Picture's description depending on whether or not it's a child or parent Picture (they can be nested). The example is a bit contrived...I could easily avoid this by using a method without the same name as the database column...such as def my_description if parent_id.nil? # return db data since no parent self.description else # return parent's description if one exists description = Picture.find(parent_id).description end end I guess I'm trying to be unnecessarily complicated here –  Jeff Locke Jul 27 '12 at 4:58
    
see edit in the original question. was trying to have the method with the same name as the database column, but this seems like it's just making things unnecessarily complicated –  Jeff Locke Jul 27 '12 at 5:04
    
You can use super? I thought that Rails didn't define attribute accessors if there was already a method defined called the same? Just tried it in my own project and it seems you're right. Cool :) –  Ryan Bigg Jul 27 '12 at 5:11

You should be using read_attribute(:description) in your description method (which is okay to override).

Additionally you can do parent.description in the else section instead of Picture.find rigmarole. Use parent association which I'm sure you have.

def description
  # if parent_id is there and the parent object can be found and that parent has a description
  if (parent_id? && parent && parent.description?)
    # show parental description
    parent.description
  else
    # read my own database attribute
    read_attribute(:description)
  end
end

Not sure if assigning to description above will do anything since it will end up being a local variable. And doing self.description= in the reader is just slightly nasty IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
cool. looks like read_attributes(:description) also works the same as Beerlington's suggestion of calling "super". Thanks for the help –  Jeff Locke Jul 27 '12 at 12:09

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