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I'm fixing some PHP scripts and I'm missing ruby's pretty printer. i.e.

require 'pp'
arr = {:one => 1}
pp arr

will output {:one => 1}. This even works with fairly complex objects and makes digging into an unknown script much easier. Is there some way to duplicate this functionality in PHP?

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19 Answers 19

up vote 69 down vote accepted

Both print_r() and var_dump() will output visual representations of objects within PHP.

$arr = array('one' => 1);
print_r($arr);
var_dump($arr);
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31  
If you install the XDebug extension, the var_dump becomes an even prettier printer. –  Alan Storm Jul 22 '09 at 20:56
1  
Thank you, turns out it's just an issue of naming! I say po ta to you say pa_ta_to. –  Aaron Lee Jul 22 '09 at 20:57
47  
To make it look even nicer in a browser use: echo "<pre>"; print_r($arr); echo "</pre>"; –  Domenic Jul 22 '09 at 23:30
9  
To Domenic's point just wrap it: function pr($array = null) { print "<pre><code>" . print_r($array) . "</code></pre>"; } –  Darren Newton Jul 23 '09 at 0:53
7  
@darren_n: print_r() automatically outputs and doesn't return anything (unless its second parameter is true), so you can't concatenate to another string. Use the following instead: function pr($var) { print '<pre>'; print_r($var); print '</pre>'; } –  Andrew Moore Jul 23 '09 at 13:55

This is what I use to print my arrays:

    ?>
    <pre>
    <?php
    print_r($your_array);
    ?>
    </pre>
    <?php

The magic comes with "pre" tag... Have a nice day!!!

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that's what i was looking for -- couple lines, easy to read –  circusdei Apr 11 '12 at 19:13
1  
Yeah, spot on!! –  Larry B May 28 '12 at 15:33
    
Easy and perfect. I'm having a nice day. –  Geoff Kendall Dec 13 '13 at 16:09
    
best answer by far! –  denikov Apr 6 at 18:13
    
This is actually much better than var_dump because var_dump trims the result if it's a big array or a big string... –  Radu Murzea Aug 1 at 11:39

For simplicity, print_r() and var_dump() can't be beat. If you want something a little fancier or are dealing with large lists and/or deeply nested data, Krumo will make your life much easier - it provides you with a nicely formatted collapsing/expanding display.

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4  
+1 for Krumo. A very nice tool! –  Gary Willoughby Jul 22 '09 at 22:27
    
I've used it before - and it's pretty cool ) –  Malachi Aug 20 '10 at 19:57
    
getting warning on link in chrome –  circusdei Apr 11 '12 at 19:12

For PHP, you can easily take advantage of HTML and some simple recursive code to make a pretty representation of nested arrays and objects.

function pp($arr){
    $retStr = '<ul>';
    if (is_array($arr)){
        foreach ($arr as $key=>$val){
            if (is_array($val)){
                $retStr .= '<li>' . $key . ' => ' . pp($val) . '</li>';
            }else{
                $retStr .= '<li>' . $key . ' => ' . $val . '</li>';
            }
        }
    }
    $retStr .= '</ul>';
    return $retStr;
}

This will print the array as a list of nested HTML lists. HTML and your browser will take care of indenting and making it legible.

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How about print_r?

http://www.php.net/print_r

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Remember to set html_errors = on in php.ini to get pretty printing of var_dump() in combination with xdebug.

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The best I found yet is this :

echo "<pre>";
print_r($arr);
echo "</pre>";

And if you want it more detailed :

echo "<pre>";
var_dump($arr);
echo "</pre>";
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nice trick thanks –  good4m Jan 2 at 6:58
error_log(print_r($variable,true));

to send to syslog or eventlog for windows

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If you're doing more debugging, Xdebug is essential. By default it overrides var_dump() with it's own version which displays a lot more information than PHP's default var_dump().

There's also Zend_Debug.

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2  
Blarg. Xdebug's var dump sucks because it outputs HTML... Oh yeah, looks fantastic on a CLI test. –  jason Jul 23 '09 at 4:12
    
Xdebug uses different output for CLI these days. –  Jeff Hubbard Dec 24 '12 at 14:08

This is a little function I use all the time its handy if you are debugging arrays. The title parameter gives you some debug info as what array you are printing. it also checks if you have supplied it with a valid array and lets you know if you didn't.

function print_array($title,$array){

        if(is_array($array)){

            echo $title."<br/>".
            "||---------------------------------||<br/>".
            "<pre>";
            print_r($array); 
            echo "</pre>".
            "END ".$title."<br/>".
            "||---------------------------------||<br/>";

        }else{
             echo $title." is not an array.";
        }
}

Basic usage:

//your array
$array = array('cat','dog','bird','mouse','fish','gerbil');
//usage
print_array("PETS", $array);

Results:

PETS
||---------------------------------||

Array
(
    [0] => cat
    [1] => dog
    [2] => bird
    [3] => mouse
    [4] => fish
    [5] => gerbil
)

END PETS
||---------------------------------||
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why downvote? works well doesn't it? I'm not gonna cry about it just curious if i am doing something wrong. I'm self taught so please enlighten me. –  Laurence Jan 5 '12 at 23:48

a one-liner that will give you the rough equivalent of "viewing source" to see array contents:

assumes php 4.3.0+:

echo nl2br(str_replace(' ', ' ', print_r($_SERVER, true)));

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This function works pretty well so long as you set header('Content-type: text/plain'); before outputting the return string

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.json-encode.php#80339

<?php
// Pretty print some JSON
function json_format($json)
{
    $tab = "  ";
    $new_json = "";
    $indent_level = 0;
    $in_string = false;

    $json_obj = json_decode($json);

    if($json_obj === false)
        return false;

    $json = json_encode($json_obj);
    $len = strlen($json);

    for($c = 0; $c < $len; $c++)
    {
        $char = $json[$c];
        switch($char)
        {
            case '{':
            case '[':
                if(!$in_string)
                {
                    $new_json .= $char . "\n" . str_repeat($tab, $indent_level+1);
                    $indent_level++;
                }
                else
                {
                    $new_json .= $char;
                }
                break;
            case '}':
            case ']':
                if(!$in_string)
                {
                    $indent_level--;
                    $new_json .= "\n" . str_repeat($tab, $indent_level) . $char;
                }
                else
                {
                    $new_json .= $char;
                }
                break;
            case ',':
                if(!$in_string)
                {
                    $new_json .= ",\n" . str_repeat($tab, $indent_level);
                }
                else
                {
                    $new_json .= $char;
                }
                break;
            case ':':
                if(!$in_string)
                {
                    $new_json .= ": ";
                }
                else
                {
                    $new_json .= $char;
                }
                break;
            case '"':
                if($c > 0 && $json[$c-1] != '\\')
                {
                    $in_string = !$in_string;
                }
            default:
                $new_json .= $char;
                break;                   
        }
    }

    return $new_json;
}
?>
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Since I found this via google searching for how to format json to make it more readable for troubleshooting.

ob_start() ;  print_r( $json ); $ob_out=ob_get_contents(); ob_end_clean(); echo "\$json".str_replace( '}', "}\n", $ob_out );
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1  
this can be greatly simplified using print_r($json,1) –  SorcyCat Apr 29 '11 at 16:59

I think the best solution for pretty printing json in php is to change the header:

header('Content-type: text/javascript');

(if you do text/json many browsers will prompt a download... facebook does text/javascript for their graph protocol so it must not be too bad)

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If your server objects to you changing headers (to plain text) after some have been sent, or if you don't want to change your code, just "view source" from your browser--your text editor (even notepad) will process new lines better than your browser, and will turn a jumbled mess:

Array ( [root] => 1 [sub1] => Array ( ) [sub2] => Array ( ) [sub3] => Array ( ) [sub4] => Array ( ) ...

into a properly tabbed representation:

[root] => 1
  [sub1] => Array
      (
      )

  [sub2] => Array
      (
      )

  [sub3] => Array
      (
      )

  [sub4] => Array
      (
      )...
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FirePHP is a firefox plugin that print have a much pretty logging feature.

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If you want to use the result in further functions, you can get a valid PHP expression as a string using var_export:

$something = array(1,2,3);
$some_string = var_export($something, true);

For a lot of the things people are doing in their questions, I'm hoping they've dedicated a function and aren't copy pasting the extra logging around. var_export achieves a similar output to var_dump in these situations.

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I use this function for debugging:

function pre($pre=true) {
    if($pre) {
        echo "<pre>";
    }
    foreach(func_get_args as $arg) {
        print_r($arg);
        # or, if it pleases you more:
        # var_dump(arg); 
    }
    if($pre) {
        echo "<pre>";
    }

}

This way you don't have to

pre($arrayOne);
pre($arrayTwo);

But in one go:

pre($arrayOne, $arrayTwo); 

Or as many arguments you give it.

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I pulled a few of these options together into a wee little helper function at

http://github.com/perchten/neat_html/

You can print to html, neatly outputted, as well as jsonify the string, auto-print or return etc.

It handles file includes, objects, arrays, nulls vs false and the like.

There's also some globally accessible (but well scoped) helpers for when using settings in a more environment-like way

Plus dynamic, array-based or string optional arguments.

And, I keep adding to it. So it's supported :D

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