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I have been looking over a couple of classes I have in an android project, and I realized that I have been mixing logic with data. Having realized how bad this can be to the readability and the test-ability of my project, I decided to do some refactoring in order to abstract away all services logic to separate services modules. However, since I have been relying on Java's polymorphism, I got lost and need some guidance.

Suppose I have this "to-be-changed" layout for a super data class, and two sub-classes:

public class DataItem {
    /* some variables */ 

    public saveToDB(/* Some Arguments */) {
        /* do some stuff */
    }

    public render() {
        /* render the class */
    }
}

public class ChildDataItemA extends DataItem {
    @Override
    public saveToDB(/* Some Arguments */) {
        super.saveToDB(); 
        /* more specific logic to ChildDataItemA */
    }

    @Override
    public render() {
        /* render logic for ChildDataItemA */
    }
}

public class ChildDataItemB extends DataItem {
    @Override
    public saveToDB(/* Some Arguments */) {
        super.saveToDB(); 
        /* more specific logic to ChildDataItemB */
    }

    @Override
    public render() {
        /* render logic for ChildDataItemB */
    }
}

Now, I thought about moving the saveToDB() and render() methods to a service class. However, sometimes I need to be able to call these method into instance of compiled type DataItem without knowing its runtime type. For instance, I might want to make the following call:

List<DataItem> dataList; 
for (DataItem item: dataList) {
    item.saveToDB();
    item.render();
}

Additionally, I thought of doing the following:

public class ChildDataItemB extends DataItem {
    @Override
    public saveToDB(/* Some Arguments */) {
        super.saveToDB(); 
        /* more specific logic to ChildDataItemB */
         Service.saveToDBB();
    }

    @Override
    public render() {
        /* render logic for ChildDataItemB */
        Service.renderB();
    }
}

Where I still keep 'dummy' methods in each subclass that would call an appropriate service method. However, I do not think that this really achieves the separation I want since data classes will still know about services (bad!).

Any ideas on how to solve this?

Edit: Note that render() and saveToDB() are just generic examples of what these methods can be, so the problem is not really about choosing an ORM or SQL related techniques.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a case for the Repository pattern. As others have said, I'd remove the saveToDB method from the DataItem. –  TrueWill Jul 29 '12 at 14:57
    
I don't know, to me it seems like you simultaneously want the logic to save items to the DB to be available at the model layer, except you also don't want it available there. These are contradictions, you have to pick one, or separate your concerns further: find an acceptable subset of what the service does when saving items that you'll expose to them using some sort of interface. –  millimoose Aug 2 '12 at 20:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+25

Visitor pattern to the rescue. Create a visitor interface and have each service implement this interface:

public interface DataItemVisitor {
  // one method for each subtype you want to handle
  void process(ChildDataItemA item);
  void process(ChildDataItemB item);
}

public class PersistenceService implements DataItemVisitor { ... }
public class RenderService implements DataItemVisitor { ... }

Then have each DataItem implement an accept method:

public abstract class DataItem {
  public abstract void accept(DataItemVisitor visitor);
}

public class ChildDataItemA extends DataItem {
  @Override
  public void accept(DataItemVisitor visitor) {
    visitor.process(this);
  }
}

public class ChildDataItemB extends DataItem {
  @Override
  public void accept(DataItemVisitor visitor) {
    visitor.process(this);
  }
}

Note that all accept implementations look the same but this refers to the correct type in each subclass. Now you can add new services without having to change the DataItem classes.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: The original question was: "Separating Service Logic from Data". In your solution, both the PersistenceService and the RenderService Logic are tightly coupled to the Data classes. Even so far that when you add a new Data class, you need to add new methods to the services to handle with them. –  greyfairer Aug 8 '12 at 13:47
    
@greyfairer: It is up to the OP to decide which solution suits him best. Please reserve downvotes for incorrect/misleading answers, and not because you don't like an answer. –  casablanca Aug 9 '12 at 2:18
    
@greyfairer: As for your argument on coupling, it isn't necessarily bad for services to be coupled to entities, as long as the entities themselves aren't aware of the services. –  casablanca Aug 9 '12 at 2:21
    
I was avoiding the visitor pattern, but I am going to mark this as the answer. –  Sam Jun 12 '13 at 22:31

So you want to do:

List<DataItem> dataList; 
for (DataItem item: dataList) {
    service.saveToDB(item);
    service.render(item);
}

For this you need to setup a system for your service to know more details from your DataItem subclass.

ORM's and serializers usually solve this via a metadata system, e.g. by finding an xml file with name matching the subclass, containing the properties to save or serialize.

ChildDataItemA.xml
<metaData>
   <column name="..." property="..."/>
</metaData>

You could get the same result via reflection and annotations.

In your case, an application of the Bridge pattern could also work:

class DataItem {
    public describeTo(MetaData metaData){
       ...
    }    
}

class Service {
   public void saveToDB(DataItem item) {
      MetaData metaData = new MetaData();
      item.describeTo(metaData);
      ...
   }
}

Your metadata could be decoupled from saving or rendering, so you can the same for both.

share|improve this answer

I would clean the "data" classes of render and saveToDB methods.

Instead, I would create a hierarchy of wrappers for DataItem (it does not have to mimic exactly the DataItem hierarchy). These wrappers will be the ones implementing those methods.

Additionally, I suggest that (if you can), you move to some ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) like Hibernate or JPA to get rid of the saveToDB method.

share|improve this answer
    
The saveToDB() is just an example, it is not what I have (I have different other method that do other things). Additionally, this is an android project, so all the db saving is done via ContentProvidors (no direct SQL). –  Sam Jul 27 '12 at 7:00

First of all the DataItem class should be clean, only with getters and setter and no logic at all, just like a POJO. moreover- your DataItem maybe should be abstract.

Now- for the logic, like others suggested I would use some ORM framework for the saveToDB part, but you said that it's not helping you cause it's android project and you have other methods like this as well.

So what I would do is to create an interface- IDataItemDAO, with the following logic:

public interface IDataItemDAO<T extends DataItem > {
    public void saveToDB(T data, /* Some Arguments */);
    ... other methods that you need ...
}

I would create an abstract DAO for the DataItem and put it all the similar code of all DataItems:

public abstract class ChildDataItemADAO impelemets IDataItemDAO<DataItem> {
    @Override
    public void saveToDB(DataItem data, /* Some Arguments */); {
        ...
    }
}

than I would create a DAO for each DataItem class that you have:

public class ChildDataItemADAO extends DataItemDAO impelemets IDataItemDAO<ChildDataItemA> {
    @Override
    public void saveToDB(ChildDataItemA data, /* Some Arguments */); {
        super(data, ...);
        //other specific saving
    }
}

the other part is how to use the correct DAO for the correct instance, for this I would create a class that will bring me the correct DAO for the given instance, it is a very simple method if an if-else statements (or you can do it dynamically with a map of class and the DAO)

public DataItemDAO getDao(DataItem item) {
    if (item instanceof ChildDataItemA) {
        //save the instance ofcourse
        return new ChildDataItemADAO();
    }
}

so you should use it like this:

List<DataItem> dataList; 
for (DataItem item: dataList) {
    factory.getDao(item).saveToDB(item);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess I wanted to a clean idea to seperate the services from data, while keeping polymorphism, in order to avoid using instanceof in the first place. I have talked to many engineers, and they suggest that anyplace where instanceof is being used represents a weakness in the design, ans should not be there at all. –  Sam Jul 29 '12 at 11:34
    
There is something about what they saying. like I said- you can also get this mapping with a map of class and the DAO instance, and get the right instance by item.class –  shem Jul 29 '12 at 11:45

If you want separate logic from data you may try the following approach

Create your data class DataItem,ChildDataItemA, ChildDataItemB without the method operating on the data

Create an interface for some operations on you data class something like

public interface OperationGroup1OnDataItem {
        public void saveToDB(DataItem dataItem/*plus other params*/) {

        }
        public void render(DataItem dataItem/*plus other params*/) {

        }
        ......
}

Create a factory for implementing an OperationGroup provider

public class OperationFactoryProvider {
    public static OperationGroup1OnDataItem getOperationGroup1For(Class class) {
    ....
    }
}

Use it in you code:

List<DataItem> dataList; 
for (DataItem item: dataList) {
    OperationGroup1OnDataItem  provider OperationFactoryProvider.getOperationGroup1For(item.class);
    provider.saveToDB(item);
    provider.render(item);
}

You can choose to implement the factory with a simple static map where you put the class (or the class fullName) as the key and an Object implementing the interface as the value; something like

 Map<String,OperationGroup1OnDataItem> factoryMap= new HashMap<String,OperationGroup1OnDataItem>();
 factoryMap.put(DataItem.class.getName(),new SomeClassThatImplementsOperationGroup1OnDataItemForDataItem());
 factoryMap.put(ChildDataItemA.class.getName(),new SomeClassThatImplementsOperationGroup1OnDataItemForChildDataItemA());

The implementation of the getOperationGroup1For is:

return factoryMap.get(item.getClass().getName());

This is one example of separating logic from data, if you want separate logic from data your logic methods must be extracted from your data class; otherwise there is no separation. So I think every solution must start from removing logic methods.

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