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I have the following data type:

class A{
public:
    A(){
    }
    ~A(){
        for(size_t i=0; i<b_elements.size(); i++)
            delete b_elements[i];
        b_elements.clear();
    }
    vector<B*> b_elements;
    //other operations ...
};

A visitor design pattern is implemented to do some calculations on A.

The problem starts when I want to work on a subset of b_elements only and to apply the visitor on specifically those elements.

One solution would be to create another object of A with its b_elements pointing to the desired elements in the original object and calling the visitor on the newly created object. But (as you would expect) the problem is when the new object is destroyed, the destructor will delete those references which will affect the original object as a side effect.

Hint: I cannot create a copy from the original object with the desired b_elements because it is too expensive.

My question is, is this a common pattern? and what is the best practice to avoid such problem?

share|improve this question

Store vector of shared pointers:

class A{
public:
    A(){
    }
    vector<std::shared_ptr<B>> b_elements;
    //other operations ...
};
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that this solution will keep those objects of class B around until you delete both object of class A. If you want to automatically invalidate all the references in the "smaller" A object (i.e. if that object has just the semantic of a "view" on the bigger one), then you have to find another solution. – Marco Leogrande Jul 27 '12 at 7:04
1  
@H.Josef it is indeed. – yuri kilochek Jul 27 '12 at 7:13
1  
@H.Josef that is correct. The compiler-synthesized destructor will do. – juanchopanza Jul 27 '12 at 7:16
1  
@H.Josef you can use shared_ptr from boost which behaves the same way and is supported on reasonably old compilers. – yuri kilochek Jul 27 '12 at 7:31
1  
@H.Josef shared_ptr in boost is header only, its unlikely you will have any problems. – yuri kilochek Jul 27 '12 at 7:46

Or a shared pointer for the vector

class A{
public:
    A(){
    }
    std::shared_ptr< std::vector<B*> > b_elements;
    //other operations ...
};

With this approach, only the vector will be destroyed at the end, and not it's elements.

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