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Java requires that if you call this() or super() in a constructor, it must be the first statement. Why?

For example:

public class MyClass {
	public MyClass(int x) {}
}

public class MySubClass extends MyClass {
	public MySubClass(int a, int b) {
		int c = a + b;
		super(c);  // COMPILE ERROR
	}
}

The Sun compiler says "call to super must be first statement in constructor". The Eclipse compiler says "Constructor call must be the first statement in a constructor".

However, you can get around this by re-arranging the code a little bit:

public class MySubClass extends MyClass {
	public MySubClass(int a, int b) {
		super(a + b);  // OK
	}
}

Here is another example:

public class MyClass {
	public MyClass(List list) {}
}

public class MySubClassA extends MyClass {
	public MySubClassA(Object item) {
		// Create a list that contains the item, and pass the list to super
		List list = new ArrayList();
		list.add(item);
		super(list);  // COMPILE ERROR
	}
}

public class MySubClassB extends MyClass {
	public MySubClassB(Object item) {
		// Create a list that contains the item, and pass the list to super
		super(Arrays.asList(new Object[] { item }));  // OK
	}
}

So, it is not stopping you from executing logic before the call to super. It is just stopping you from executing logic that you can't fit into a single expression.

There are similar rules for calling this(). The compiler says "call to this must be first statement in constructor".

Why does the compiler have these restrictions? Can you give a code example where, if the compiler did not have this restriction, something bad would happen?

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3  
This is very interesting. –  Eliseo Ocampos Jul 22 '09 at 21:27
38  
hatehatehatehatehate so much hate for this. Why can't there just be a "object not yet constructed" exception, so that I don't have to shove everything into one line? –  Carson Myers Nov 13 '10 at 3:02
1  
A good question. I have started a similar in valjok.blogspot.com/2012/09/… and programmers.exchange where I show that there are cases where subfields must be initialized prior to the super(). So that the feature adds to complexity of doing things whereas it is not clear if positive impacts regarding to "code safety" overweight the negative ones. Yes, there are negative consequences of super always first. Surprisingly that nobody mentions this. I think that this is a conceptual thing and must be asked in programmers.exchange –  Val Sep 10 '12 at 8:47
    
Thanks for clearly describing how to work around this restriction! –  Grilse Feb 28 '13 at 14:08
4  
The worst part is that this is purely a Java restriction. At the bytecode level there's no such restriction. –  Antimony Dec 3 '13 at 15:55

12 Answers 12

The parent class' constructor needs to be called before the subclass' constructor. This will ensure that if you call any methods on the parent class in your constructor, the parent class has already been set up correctly.

What you are trying to do, pass args to the super constructor is perfectly legal, you just need to construct those args inline as you are doing, or pass them in to your constructor and then pass them to super:

public MySubClassB extends MyClass {
        public MySubClassB(Object[] myArray) {
                super(myArray);
        }
}

If the compiler did not enforce this you could do this:

public MySubClassB extends MyClass {
        public MySubClassB(Object[] myArray) {
                someMethodOnSuper(); //ERROR super not yet constructed
                super(myArray);
        }
}

In cases where a parent class has a default constructor the call to super is inserted for you automatically by the compiler. Since every class in Java inherits from Object, objects constructor must be called somehow and it must be executed first. The automatic insertion of super() by the compiler allows this. Enforcing super to appear first, enforces that constructor bodies are executed in the correct order which would be: Object -> Parent -> Child -> ChildOfChild -> SoOnSoForth

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56  
I think I disagree, for two reasons... (1) Checking that super is the first statement is not sufficient to prevent that problem. For example, you could put "super(someMethodInSuper());" in your constructor. This attempts to access a method in the superclass before it is constructed, even though super is the first statement. (2) The compiler appears to implement a different check which is, by itself, sufficient to prevent this problem. The message is "cannot reference xxx before supertype constructor has been called". Therefore, checking that super is the first statement is not necessary. –  Joe Daley Jul 23 '09 at 0:22
2  
@Joe You are correct, placing super() as the first statement does not prevent calling methods on the parent before it is called. As you mentioned that is a separate check. However it does enforce the order in which the bodies of the constructors are executed? Agreed? I believe that this is the reason for making the call to super() the first statement. –  anio Jul 23 '09 at 0:39
3  
Considering the compiler knows when you're accessing parent methods/fields I don't see why you can't be allowed something along the lines of Constructor(int x) { this.field1 = x; super(); }. Sure, you shouldn't need to in an ideal world where you control the code, but that's not always the case. The reason I looked this up in the first place was because I was annoyed I couldn't use it to get around a flaw in 3rd party code. –  Thor84no Jul 25 '12 at 9:29
5  
Agreeing with @JoeDaley I think the fact that C# does not have this restriction is enough to suggest that this problem can be solved in less ham-fisted ways. –  Tom Lianza Jan 5 '13 at 4:32
2  
@Tom Indeed, but this isn't C#, and we have pretty much established that Sun was kinda dumb when deciding about some constructs. :/ –  d3dave Sep 5 '13 at 19:46

I've found a way around this by chaining constructors and static methods. What I wanted to do looked something like this:

public class Foo extends Baz {
  private final Bar m_myBar;

  public Foo(final String p_arg1, final String p_arg2) {
    // ...
    // ... Some other stuff needed to construct a 'Bar'...
    // ...
    final Bar b = new Bar(p_arg1, p_arg2);
    super(b.baz()):
    m_myBar = b;
  }
}

So basically construct an object based on constructor parameters, store the object in a member, and also pass the result of a method on that object into super's constructor. Making the member final was also reasonably important as the nature of the class is that it's immutable. Note that as it happens, constructing Bar actually takes a few intermediate objects, so it's not reducible to a one-liner in my actual use case.

I ended up making it work something like this:

public class Foo extends Baz {
  private final Bar m_myBar;

  private static Bar makeBar(final String p_arg1,  final String p_arg2) {
    // My more complicated setup routine to actually make 'Bar' goes here...
    return new Bar(p_arg1, p_arg2);
  }

  private Foo(final Bar p_bar) {
    super(p_bar.baz());
    m_myBar = p_bar;
  }

  public Foo(final String p_arg1, final String p_arg2) {
    this(makeBar(p_arg1, p_arg2));
  }
}

Legal code, and it accomplishes the task of executing multiple statements before calling the super constructor.

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2  
+1, simply ingenious. –  Pacerier Aug 24 at 17:53

Because the JLS says so. Could the JLS be changed in a compatible manner to allow it? Yup. However, it would complicate the language spec, which is already more than complicated enough. It wouldn't be a highly useful thing to do and there are ways around it (call another constructor with the result of a method this(fn()) - the method is called before the other constructor, and hence also the super constructor). So the power to weight ratio of doing the change is unfavourable.

share|improve this answer
    
just to clarify: the fn() you used in your example should be a static method, right? –  Jason S Jul 22 '09 at 22:09
5  
Yup - you can't touch this. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 22 '09 at 23:16
    
: - ) –  Jason S Jul 23 '09 at 14:55
2  
+1 for mentioning that this is purely a JLS restriction. At the bytecode level, you can do other stuff before calling a constructor. –  Antimony Dec 3 '13 at 15:53

I am fairly sure (those familiar with the Java Specification chime in) that it is to prevent you from (a) being allowed to use a partially-constructed object, and (b), forcing the parent class's constructor to construct on a "fresh" object.

Some examples of a "bad" thing would be:

class Thing
{
    final int x;
    Thing(int x) { this.x = x; }
}

class Bad1 extends Thing
{
    final int z;
    Bad1(int x, int y)
    {
        this.z = this.x + this.y; // WHOOPS! x hasn't been set yet
        super(x);
    }        
}

class Bad2 extends Thing
{
    final int y;
    Bad2(int x, int y)
    {
        this.x = 33;
        this.y = y; 
        super(x); // WHOOPS! x is supposed to be final
    }        
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should Bad1 and Bad2 extend Thing there? –  Michael Myers Jul 22 '09 at 21:39
    
Ah, thanks. duh. –  Jason S Jul 22 '09 at 22:06
5  
I disagree with Bad2 as x gets declared in Thing and simply must not be set anywhere else. As for Bad1, you're surely right, but a similar thing may happen when the super constructor invokes a method overridden in the subclass which accesses a (not yet initialized) variable of the subclass. So the restriction helps to prevent one part of the problem... which is IMHO not worth it. –  maaartinus Apr 17 '11 at 8:16

You asked why, and the other answers, imo, don't really say why it's ok to call your super's constructor, but only if it's the very first line. The reason is that you're not really calling the constructor. In C++, the equivalent syntax is

MySubClass: MyClass {

public:

 MySubClass(int a, int b): MyClass(a+b)
 {
 }

};

When you see the initializer clause on its own like that, before the open brace, you know it's special. It runs before any of the rest of the constructor runs and in fact before any of the member variables are initialized. It's not that different for Java. There's a way to get some code (other constructors) to run before the constructor really starts, before any members of the subclass are initialized. And that way is to put the "call" (eg super) on the very first line. (In a way, that super or this is kind of before the first open brace, even though you type it after, because it will be executed before you get to the point that everything is fully constructed.) Any other code after the open brace (like int c = a + b;) makes the compiler say "oh, ok, no other constructors, we can initialize everything then." So it runs off and initializes your super class and your members and whatnot and then starts executing the code after the open brace.

If, a few lines later, it meets some code saying "oh yeah when you're constructing this object, here are the parameters I want you to pass along to the constructor for the base class", it's too late and it doesn't make any sense. So you get a compiler error.

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1  
1. If java designers wanted superconstructor implicit they could just do that and, more importantly, this does not explain why implicit superconstructor is very useful. 2. IMO, it is your comment that it does not make any sense does not make any sense. I remember I needed that. Can you prove that I did something meaningless? –  Val Jul 31 '13 at 15:21
2  
imagine you need to enter a room. The door is locked, so you smash a window, reach in and let yourself in. Inside, halfway across the room, you find a note with a key for you to use on the way in. But you're already in. Similarly if the compiler is halfway through executing a constructor and it comes across "here's what to do with those parameters before you run the constructor" what is it supposed to do? –  Kate Gregory Jul 31 '13 at 15:28
1  
If it is stupid thing in reality then it is a wrong analogy. If I am in a position to decide, which way to go, I am not in the half way. It is the rule that the supercall must be the first in constructor that prvoces us to break the window (see a lot of examples of warkingaround in the question and answers) instead of using the door. So, you put everything upside down when trying to argue for this rule. The rule must be wrong, therefore. –  Val Jul 31 '13 at 15:37
3  
-1 This does not reflect how the code is actually compiled in Java, the constraints on it, or the actual reason for designing Java the way it is. –  Antimony Jun 22 at 15:45

Simply because this is the inheritance philosophy. And according to the Java language specification, this is how the constructor's body is defined:

ConstructorBody: { ExplicitConstructorInvocationopt    BlockStatementsopt }

The first statement of a constructor body may be:
-an explicit invocation of another constructor of the same class (by using the keyword "this") OR
-of the direct superclass (by using the keyword "super")

If a constructor body does not begin with an explicit constructor invocation and the constructor being declared is not part of the primordial class Object, then the constructor body implicitly begins with a superclass constructor invocation "super();", an invocation of the constructor of its direct superclass that takes no arguments. And so on.. there will be a whole chain of constructors called all the way back to the constructor of Object; "All Classes in the Java platform are Descendants of Object". This thing is called "Constructor Chaining".

Now why is this?
And the reason why Java defined the ConstructorBody in this way, is that they needed to maintain the hierarchy of the object. Remember the definition of the inheritance; It's extending a class. With that being said, you cannot extend something that doesn't exist. The base (the superclass) needs to be created first, then you can derive it (the subclass). That's why they called them Parent and Child classes; you can't have a child without a parent.

On a technical level, a subclass inherits all the members (fields, methods, nested classes) from its parent. And since Constructors are NOT members (They don't belong to objects. They are responsible of creating objects) so they are NOT inherited by subclasses, but they can be invoked. And since at the time of object creation only ONE constructor is executed. So how do we guarantee the creation of the superclass when you create the subclass object? Thus the concept of "constructor chaining"; so we have the ability to invoke other constructors (i.e. super) from within the current constructor. And Java required this invocation to be the FIRST line in the subclass constructor to maintain the hierarchy and guarantee it. They assume that if you don't explicitly create the parent object FIRST (like if you forgot about it), they will do it implicitly for you.

This check is done during compilation. But I'm not sure what would happen on runtime, what kind of runtime error we would get, IF Java doesn't throw a compile-error when we explicitly try to execute a base constructor from within a subclass's constructor in the middle of its body and not from the very first line ...

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1  
I know that constructors aren't processed as function calls, but I would think that interpreting each super constructor call as this = [new object] and requiring that this be in defined before it is used as and before a constructor returns would be semantically sufficient to achieve the stated objectives. The inability to wrap the parent constructor calls in a try-catch-rethrow or try/finally block makes it impossible to have a subclass constructor promise not to throw something the superclass constructor might, even if the subclass would be able to guarantee... –  supercat Oct 7 '13 at 23:08
1  
...that the exception couldn't occur. It also greatly increases the difficulty of safely chaining constructors which need to acquire resources and pass them to the parent constructor (the child constructor needs to invoked by a factory method that creates a container for the resources, invokes the constructor within a try block, and discards any resources in the container if the constructor fails. –  supercat Oct 7 '13 at 23:12

You can use anonymous initializer blocks to initialize fields in the child before calling it's constructor. This example will demonstrate :

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	new Child();
    }
}

class Parent {
    public Parent() {
    	System.out.println("In parent");
    }
}

class Child extends Parent {

    {
    	System.out.println("In initializer");
    }

    public Child() {
    	super();
    	System.out.println("In child");
    }
}

This will output :

In parent
In initializer
In child

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3  
But this adds nothing over just adding the System.out.println("In initializer") as the first line after "super()", does it? What would be useful would be a way to execute code before the parent is constructed. –  Svend Hansen Jul 26 '12 at 9:31
    
Indeed. If you will try to add something, you'll need so save the computed state somewhere. Even if compiler allows you to, what will be the temporary storage? Allocate one more field just for initialization? But this is waste of memory. –  Val Sep 9 '12 at 7:50
1  
This is incorrect. Instance initializers are inserted after the parent constructor call returns. –  Antimony Dec 3 '13 at 15:54

I totally agree, the restrictions are too strong. Using a static helper method (as Tom Hawtin - tackline suggested) or shoving all "pre-super() computations" into a single expression in the parameter is not always possible, e.g.:

class Sup {
    public Sup(final int x_) { 
        //cheap constructor 
    }
    public Sup(final Sup sup_) { 
        //expensive copy constructor 
    }
}

class Sub extends Sup {
    private int x;
    public Sub(final Sub aSub) {
        /* for aSub with aSub.x == 0, 
         * the expensive copy constructor is unnecessary:
         */

         /* if (aSub.x == 0) { 
          *    super(0);
          * } else {
          *    super(aSub);
          * } 
          * above gives error since if-construct before super() is not allowed.
          */

        /* super((aSub.x == 0) ? 0 : aSub); 
         * above gives error since the ?-operator's type is Object
         */

        super(aSub); // much slower :(  

        // further initialization of aSub
    }
}

Using an "object not yet constructed" exception, as Carson Myers suggested, would help, but checking this during each object construction would slow down execution. I would favor a Java compiler that makes a better differentiation (instead of inconsequently forbidding an if-statement but allowing the ?-operator within the parameter), even if this complicates the language spec.

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Care to comment the downvote? –  DaveFar May 18 '13 at 11:45

My guess is they did this to make life easier for people writing tools that process Java code, and to some lesser degree also people who are reading Java code.

If you allow the super() or this() call to move around, there are more variations to check for. For example if you move the super() or this() call into a conditional if() it might have to be smart enough to insert an implicit super() into the else. It might need to know how to report an error if you call super() twice, or use super() and this() together. It might need to disallow method calls on the receiver until super() or this() is called and figuring out when that is becomes complicated.

Making everyone do this extra work probably seemed like a greater cost than benefit.

share|improve this answer
    
Writing a sane grammar for the feature would in itself be quite hard - such a grammar would match a statement tree where at most one leaf node is an explicit super-constructor call. I can think of a way to write it, but my approach would be quite insane. –  Trejkaz Jun 9 at 1:51

So, it is not stopping you from executing logic before the call to super. It is just stopping you from executing logic that you can't fit into a single expression.

Actually you can execute logic with several expessions, you just have to wrap your code in a static function and call it in the super statement.

Using your example:

public class MySubClassC extends MyClass {
    public MySubClassC(Object item) {
        // Create a list that contains the item, and pass the list to super
        super(createList(item));  // OK
    }

    private static List createList(item) {
        List list = new ArrayList();
        list.add(item);
        return list;
    }
}
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1  
this answer may be quite late but its the right one for the question –  NikkyD Jul 29 at 18:03

How about when you want to call super and this in a subclass?

class MountainBike extends Bicycle {

    private int seatHeight;

    public MountainBike(int seatHeight, int speed) {
        this(seatHeight);
        super(speed);
    }

    public MountainBike(int seatHeight) {
        this.seatHeight = seatHeight;
        this.setSpeed(0);
    }

    public void setHeight(int seatHeight) {
        this.seatHeight = seatHeight;
    }

}

MountainBike.java:6: call to super must be first statement in constructor
super(speed);
^ 1 error

(2)change the order of this and super, you have this:

MountainBike.java:6: call to this must be first statement in constructor this(seatHeight); ^ 1 error

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3  
This one is easy to fix: you should do it the other way. The constructor with the most parameters does the actual job, all other constructors call it with the defaults. In your case MountainBike(int, int) calls super(speed); and then assigns this.seatHeight = seatHeight;. The second constructor MountainBike(int) simply calls this(seatHeight, 0);. –  Alexey Ivanov Sep 14 '12 at 8:39

Tldr:

The other answers have tackled the "why" of the question. I'll provide a hack around this limitation:

The basic idea is to hijack the super statement with your embedded statements. This can be done by disguising your statements as expressions.

Tsdr:

Consider we want to do Statement1() to Statement9() before we call super():

public class Child extends Parent {
    public Child(T1 _1, T2 _2, T3 _3) {
        Statement_1();
        Statement_2();
        Statement_3(); // and etc...
        Statement_9();
        super(_1, _2, _3); // compiler rejects because this is not the first line
    }
}

The compiler will of course reject our code. So instead, we can do this:

// This compiles fine:

public class Child extends Parent {
    public Child(T1 _1, T2 _2, T3 _3) {
        super(F(), _2, _3);
    }

    public static T1 F(T1 _1) {
        Statement_1();
        Statement_2();
        Statement_3(); // and etc...
        Statement_9();
        return _1;
    }
}

The only limitation is that the parent class must have a constructor which takes in at least one argument so that we can sneak in our statement as an expression.

Here is a more elaborate example:

public class Child extends Parent {
    public Child(int i, String s, T1 t1) {
        i = i * 10 - 123;
        if (s.length() > i) {
            s = "This is substr s: " + s.substring(0, 5);
        } else {
            s = "Asdfg";
        }
        t1.Set(i);
        T2 t2 = t1.Get();
        t2.F();
        Object obj = Static_Class.A_Static_Method(i, s, t1);
        super(obj, i, "some argument", s, t1, t2); // compiler rejects because this is not the first line
    }
}

Reworked into:

// This compiles fine:

public class Child extends Parent {
    public Child(int i, String s, T1 t1) {
        super(Arg1(i, s, t1), Arg2(i), "some argument", Arg4(i, s), t1, Arg6(i, t1));
    }

    private static Object Arg1(int i, String s, T1 t1) {
        i = Arg2(i);
        s = Arg4(s);
        return Static_Class.A_Static_Method(i, s, t1);
    }

    private static int Arg2(int i) {
        i = i * 10 - 123;
        return i;
    }

    private static String Arg4(int i, String s) {
        i = Arg2(i);
        if (s.length() > i) {
            s = "This is sub s: " + s.substring(0, 5);
        } else {
            s = "Asdfg";
        }
        return s;
    }

    private static T2 Arg6(int i, T1 t1) {
        i = Arg2(i);
        t1.Set(i);
        T2 t2 = t1.Get();
        t2.F();
        return t2;
    }
}

In fact, compilers could have automated this process for us. They'd just chosen not to.

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