Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to change the default Environment.NewLine character for my current environment.

I have one standalone application that is writing messages to a console. When the core framework works in the console environment the new line is \r\n. When I move the core framework into a Windows service the Environment.NewLine changes to "\n".

I would like to be able to change the Console to always use "\r\n" because when I redirect the output of the console to a file the output has no "windows new lines" when read from example Notepad.

I would like Console.WriteLine to use \r\n whenever I want.

EDIT:

I am redirecting Console.out:

        ConsoleOut = File.AppendText(fileName);
        ConsoleOut.AutoFlush = true;


        Console.SetOut(ConsoleOut);
        Console.SetError(ConsoleOut);

Every Console.WriteLine or Console.Write is sent to a file but as I said I am experiencing different behaviours in Windows Service and in standalone Windows environment.

share|improve this question
    
These two statements are contradictory: "When the core framework works in the console environment the new line is \r\n", and "I would like Console.WriteLine to use \r\n whenever I want". –  ShellShock Jul 27 '12 at 9:15
    
Environment.NewLine is a constant. dotnetperls.com/newline –  Tim Schmelter Jul 27 '12 at 9:17
    
Why then if I run the same library from windows service the Console.WriteLine outputs me \n instead of \r\n. I Redirected the Console.out to a file. The same code runs in two different environment. –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 9:30
    
I've just checked my logs from one of my services; it is definitely CRLF, i.e. bytes 13, 10. I think you need to a: double check your files, b: check you haven't changed them later (for example, during transfer over FTP), and c: provide an example that actually shows it generating either CR or LF but not CRLF –  Marc Gravell Jul 27 '12 at 9:47
    
I will check them deeply. Thanks. You gave me a big help with you code samples but I still do not know where is the problem so I will wait to assign the answer until I find the solution. –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 10:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not convinced by this:

When I move the core framework into a Windows service the Environment.NewLine changes to "\n"

I've checked the IL for get_NewLine(), and it is hard-coded to:

ldstr "\r\n"
ret

So basically; the problem isn't what you think it is; changing Environment.NewLine isn't going to do anything (and: isn't possible).

So: how are you redirecting? I tend to just do something like:

if (!Environment.UserInteractive)
{
    var tw = new SlowWriter(Path.Combine(logPath,"{0}.log"));
    Console.SetError(tw);
    Console.SetOut(tw);
}

where SlowWriter is a custom type (subclasses TextWriter) that makes sure the file doesn't stay open; slower, but pretty robust:

class SlowWriter : TextWriter
{ // this opens and closs each time; slower, but doesn't lock the file
    private readonly string path;
    public SlowWriter(string path)
    {
        this.path = path;
    }
    public override System.Text.Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return System.Text.Encoding.UTF8; }
    }
    private TextWriter Append()
    {
        var finalPath = string.Format(path, DateTime.UtcNow.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
        return File.AppendText(finalPath);
    }
    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            using (var file = Append())
            {
                file.Write(value);
            }
        }
    }
    public override void Write(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        lock(this)
        {
            using (var file = Append())
            {
                file.Write(buffer, index, count);
            }
        }
    }
    public override void Write(char[] buffer)
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            using (var file = Append())
            {
                file.Write(buffer);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Marc. I am redirecting the Console.out –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 9:37

You can't modify System.Environment.NewLine

MSDN Reference

It's a readonly property

public static string NewLine { get; }

And Here you can read that NewLine return always "\r\n".

Next we look into get_NewLine and it is implemented with this IL. You can see it simply returns the "\r\n" string literal.

So I think you can use a Constant inside your application like

public const NEWLINE = "\r\n"; 

And simply use this instead of Environment.NewLine.

Console.WriteLine don't use internally Environment.NewLine instead it use a carriage return followed by a line feed. Reference Here

The default line terminator is a string whose value is a carriage return followed by a line feed ("\r\n" in C#, or vbCrLf in Visual Basic). You can change the line terminator by setting the TextWriter.NewLine property of the Out property to another string. The example provides an illustration.

There is also an example on how to modify this property :

 // Redefine the newline characters to double space.
 Console.Out.NewLine = "\r\n\r\n";
share|improve this answer
    
I agree that System.Environment.NewLine cannot be modified. I supposed that Console.WriteLine is using System.Environment.NewLine –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 9:35
    
Edited the answer with new information about Console.Writeline –  2GDev Jul 27 '12 at 9:40
    
If this Console.Out.NewLine = "\r\n\r\n"; works then this is the answer I a looking for. –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 9:43

Then I don't think you should use Environment.NewLine. What you see is the exact reason why the have it in the first place. I think you are better off by defining an appSettings that you use and set it to different values for your console application and the windows service application.

Update: Also see Marc Gravell's answer. Even though if it is hard coded I wouldn't try to change it with the motivation as above.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not using it. I only supposed that Console.WriteLine is using it. –  Patrik Jul 27 '12 at 9:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.