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See the code below:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  std::vector<double> obj(10,0);
  std::cout << &obj << std::endl;
  std::cout << &obj[0] << std::endl;
}

I want to know the difference between these two addresses & thanks! As I know, for a array like a[5], &a <=> &a[0] <=> a.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

&obj is the address of the vector itself, while the &obj[0] is the address of the data inside the vector. Arrays are nothing but data stored in them, so adress of array is effectively the same as adress of the data in it, while vector allocates its internal data on heap.

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why they are different? –  xunzhang Jul 27 '12 at 10:00
1  
@xunzhang because vector object is a bunch of pointers and maybe integers. to keep track of the buffer allocated on heap. –  yuri kilochek Jul 27 '12 at 10:02
1  
@xunzhang because the vector needs to be able to grow, it is typically implemented as having a pointer to some "heap" allocated data. The location of the first element gives you the starting position of that data, and it may change if the vector has to grow, or is swapped (see my answer for an example). –  juanchopanza Jul 27 '12 at 10:11

Maybe this helps

struct MyVector
{
  double* data;
};

int main
{
  MyVector obj;
  cout << &obj << std::endl;
  cout << obj.data << std::endl;
}

Obviously (I hope) the two pointers are different. It's just the same with std::vector.

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&obj equals to &(obj.data) –  xunzhang Jul 27 '12 at 10:18
    
@xunzhang: Yes, but in your question, you seem to think to &obj should be equal to obj.data, not &(obj.data)! –  Luc Touraille Jul 27 '12 at 10:40
1  
John, perhaps you could elaborate on your example, by adding a constructor to initialize data and an operator[]. Here, it is not clear that data will point to some heap allocated memory, and it does not explain how vector's indexing operator works. –  Luc Touraille Jul 27 '12 at 10:45

&obj is the address of the vector object.

&obj[0] is the address of the first element in the vector. Since the data are contiguous, this can be used as a starting point to access all the data.

The difference can be illustrated with an example:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{

  std::vector<int> v0{1,2,3,4,5};
  std::vector<int> v1{1,2,3,4,5};

  std::cout << "v0 " << &v0 << " " << &v0[0] << "\n";
  std::cout << "v1 " << &v1 << " " << &v1[0] << "\n";
  v0.swap(v1);
  std::cout << "v0 " << &v0 << " " << &v0[0] << "\n";
  std::cout << "v1 " << &v1 << " " << &v1[0] << "\n";
}

Here you can see that the address of the vector's data can actually change, whereas the address of the vectors cannot.

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&obj is the address of the vector on the stack. It's type is "pointer to vector" ( std::vector* ). While &obj[0] is the address of the very first double stored in the vector and is of type "pointer to double" (double*).

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what about the array? no "pointer to array"?? I really cannot understand the concept "pointer to vector". –  xunzhang Jul 27 '12 at 10:05
1  
The vector has 10 elements though. –  juanchopanza Jul 27 '12 at 10:09
    
@juanchopanza You are right. –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 27 '12 at 10:31
    
@xunzhang The is no array. You have a vector, that behaves a little bit like an array, but it is a vector. If you take the address of a variable of type vector< double >, you get an expression with the type "pointer to vector". A pointer is a variable that is capable to keep the address of an other variable. Does this makes sense to you? –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 27 '12 at 10:34

I have the feeling you misunderstand the very basic difference between std::vector and the array. What I mean is, for example

int i_array [ 5 ] = { 0 };

is not what the vector is. The vector is a class, and i_array is solely a pointer to the first integer of the array. ( And using [] on a pointer is not the same as using [] on the vector object ) While using the [] operator of vector, you are just accessing a function of the class which returns a reference to the first integer ( or double in your case ) of an array which is managed by the class vector.

So &obj gives you the pointer for your instance of the vector, your object, "this", while &obj[0] first calls operator [] which returns a reference to the first entry of your array, and with & you get the address of it.

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