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you can exit a while loop with break.

How to exit from an if .

Is there a kind of GOTO in Delphi ?

procedure ...
begin

  if .... then
    begin

      here the code to execute

      if (I want to exit = TRUE) then
        break or GOTO

      here the code not to execute if has exited

    end;

  here the code to execute

end;
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3  
How about a nested if? if (I __don't__ want to exit) then here the code not to execute if has exited end; –  Piskvor Jul 27 '12 at 10:24
    
you can use "exit" to exit form anywhere in a function|procedure –  ComputerSaysNo Jul 27 '12 at 10:38
    
and use anonymouse procedures to use exit over any block statement :-) –  Arioch 'The Jul 27 '12 at 10:43
2  
Ahhhhhhrrrrggghhhh! That code makes my skin crawl. Just use another if statement to only do the things you want to do, and do nothing if you don't want to do it. –  Nick Hodges Jul 27 '12 at 16:40
1  
Local procedures, When only called once, break readability. Instead of reading and understanding you just continuously scroll back and forth more aimed and found "Damn! where is was reading it last time". –  Arioch 'The Jul 30 '12 at 8:22

8 Answers 8

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use exceptions.

Call an Abort in inner if or loop, and catch EAbort exception where u want to continue

procedure ...
begin

 try 
  if .... then
    begin

      (*      here the code to execute  *)

      if I_want-to-exit then Abort;

      (*      here the code not to execute if has exited *)

    end;

   except on E: EABORT do ;
   end;

   (*  here the code to execute *)
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 to offset the -1, not that I think this is elegant in any way, but it's the closest to using break imo. No other answer is actually answering the op question which is "is there a goto or break?", and this seems the closest to answering his question. Answering his question with 'nested ifs' isn't answering his question. –  John Easley Jul 27 '12 at 12:56
2  
In my opinion the wrong way to use exceptions. Better is to use try if 123 then if 456 then exit; finally // code is executed in any way even for the exit end; –  mrabat Jul 27 '12 at 13:14
5  
@John well, there is goto, surely goto is closer to goto than an exception –  David Heffernan Jul 27 '12 at 14:09
    
Very interesting - I never though of using exception this way ;-) –  JustMe Jul 27 '12 at 15:01
1  
raising exceptions is 'expensive' (when used in a loop it can affect program execution speed) –  mjn Jul 28 '12 at 11:00

Like Piskvor mentioned, use nested if statement:

procedure Something;
begin    
  if IWantToEnterHere then
  begin
    // here the code to execute    
    if not IWantToExit then
      // here the code not to execute if has exited
  end;    
  // here the code to execute
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
or: if IWantToStay then :) also do not forget about "begin end" if you have multiple statements –  Marcodor Jul 27 '12 at 14:16
1  
This is the correct solution. –  Nick Hodges Jul 27 '12 at 16:40
2  
+1 I agree with this one. Although Delphi supports goto and label, the usage leads to spagheti code and maintenance nightmare. Gotos and labels remind me of low-level language such as assembly. –  Hendra Jul 28 '12 at 4:58

I am not in favour of using Exit's this way, but you asked for it...

Like @mrabat suggested in a comment to @Arioch 'The answer, you could use the fact that a finally block is always executed, regardless of Exit's and exceptions, to your advantage here:

procedure ...
begin

  if Cond1 then
  try
    // Code to execute

    if Cond2 then
      Exit;

    // Code NOT to execute if Cond2 is true
  finally
    // Code to execute even when Exit was called
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
i pushed on EXCEPT for they allow different classes of exceptions act like different target labels. If there is only one bail-out route, then Finally approach is better of course. But if one would need defferent Exit-targets, then he would have something to specify landing zone. And if-flags in such scenario would quickly shadow genuine if conditions. BTW, personally i think that code needing it might be akin for refactoring, if would be possible. –  Arioch 'The Jul 30 '12 at 8:15
    
@Arioch'The Yes, the smell rising from all kinds of if-flags in a single finally or from all kinds of specific exception types in an except block, does indicate an almost inescapable need for refactoring. –  Marjan Venema Jul 30 '12 at 8:21

In general use of break or GOTO is not considered an elegant programming style. I suggest you just invert your condition and say:

procedure ...
begin

  if .... then
    begin

    here the code to execute

    If (I want to exit <> TRUE) then
      here the code to execute if has exited( in your original code)

end;

here the code to execute

end;

share|improve this answer
    
"In general use of break or GOTO" I strongly disagree on this statement, consider a infinite loop, i.e. "while true do begin", how will you break the loop and continue with next expression without using "break"? also, "goto's and labels" are very powerful if used with care. –  ComputerSaysNo Jul 27 '12 at 10:36
1  
continue and break - yes. In FSMs for example. Random GOTO into every random part of code dangerous. KLater u move code into another unit, forget to fix goto - and it blows out randomly. –  Arioch 'The Jul 27 '12 at 10:42
    
@DorinDuminica, my experience is that GOTO goes against maintainability and readability of the code. It is also true that in certain exams is not allowed. Of course, there is always the case in which they are required. –  Picarus Jul 29 '12 at 17:56

This is commonly implemented like this:

function testOne: Boolean;
begin
  ...
end;

function testTwo: Boolean;
begin
  ...
end;

procedure runTests;
var
  bOK: Boolean;

begin
  bOK = True;

  if bOK then
  begin
    // Test something
    bOK = testOne;
    // If we passed, keep going
  end;

  if bOK then
  begin
    // Test something else
    bOK = testTwo;
    // If we passed, keep going
  end;

  ...
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, this makes the logic more clear. I usually have the TestOne and TestTwo declared inside the runTests to make it clear where it belongs, as long as they cannot be reused somewhere else. –  LU RD Jul 27 '12 at 20:40
    
@LURD +1 for nested procedures - a nice encapsulation that I sorely miss in C++ etc, especially in message-handlers and the like that have a big case statement and lots of action procs called by each state. If nothing else, I don't have to continually add new action procs to the class in a .h file <g> –  Martin James Jul 27 '12 at 23:53

Use local inline procedure instead GOTO sentence; GOTO sentence decrease visibility of you code.

procedure ...

  procedue Check; inline;
  begin
    if .... then
      begin

        here the code to execute

        if (I want to exit = TRUE) then
          exit;

        here the code not to execute if has exited

      end;
  end;

begin

  Check;

  here the code to execute

end;
share|improve this answer
1  
I actually like this style - even better than using try finally blocks to circumvent the final exit. –  mrabat Jul 27 '12 at 13:57
    
with newer Delphi i'd maybe even made it using anonymous procedure, just declared and instantly called. Though less fast than local procedure, iot would be more readable. When complex function calls a lot of local procedures and each one is only called once - that just turns reading and understanding into scrolling training session :-( –  Arioch 'The Jul 30 '12 at 8:19

After reading the different comments, I decided to post an answer to show how to use the GoTo instruction... BTW, I prefer other methods explained in other answers avoiding its usage :

procedure ...
label
  CodeToExecute;
const
  iWantToExit = True;
begin
  if ... then
    begin
      ShowMessage('here the code to execute 1');
      if iWantToExit then
        goto CodeToExecute;

        ShowMessage('here the code not to execute if has exited');
    end;

CodeToExecute:
  ShowMessage('here the code to execute 2');

end;
share|improve this answer
3  
-1 without comment... this code works and answers the question... –  Whiler Jul 27 '12 at 18:15

You can use the following method to exit out of an 'if' block by using 'break'. Following example assumes that there are two edit boxes on the form. repeat ... until true; replaces the usual begin ... end;

   if ... then
   repeat
     Edit1.Text := 'test';
     if someCondition then 
       break;
     Edit2.Text := 'test';
   until true;

Edit: Clarification, the solution is just assuming the question is a brain teaser. This is not my recommended way to handle the situation and I will never use this in my code.

share|improve this answer
    
This code also works and answers. So i am plussing it to get it back to neutral zero. The problem itself is not elegant and all solutions have their drawbacks. Depressing some answer without comment WHY it is worse than other alternatives gave no valuable information. –  Arioch 'The Jul 30 '12 at 8:24

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