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As i have one Abstract base class say MyBase. It have parameterized constructor with string value it have abstract method call. And I also have One child class say MyChild. It does not have any constructor only one have public method and i want to call that parameterized constructor of base class onto child class.

Please give me solution accordingly...

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This question needs some clarification. Please include some code showing your problem. –  comecme Jul 27 '12 at 14:29

3 Answers 3

I really haven't got much of a clue about what you are asking here, so I'll guess:

abstract class MyBase
{
    protected MyBase(string foo) { }
}

class Child : MyBase
{
    public Child(string foo)
        : base(foo) 
    { }
}

You won't be able to "call" it without it being part of the construction of Child as you cannot instantiate abstract classes.

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If you don't specify constructors in child class than the constructors of parent class will be used. I.e. you can instantiate your Child class as

Child child = new Child(initString);

the above Child constructor if NOT defined will just propagate (call) parent constructor with the same signature.

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Sorry can't get it. will you please explore it. –  user1542287 Jul 27 '12 at 11:07
    
If you base class does not contain parameterless constructor - you can't do that trik. –  Anton Sizikov Jul 27 '12 at 11:16
    
@Anton Sizikov: Funny, always thought that this is the way they will behave (never had to try it before) - proven wrong, admit it. –  Germann Arlington Jul 27 '12 at 12:52

It's hard to help you without any context, but I'll try. Maybe you can do something like that:

    abstract class MyBase
    {
      protected string _foo;
      protected MyBase(string foo) 
      {
         _foo = foo;
      }
    }

    class Child : MyBase
    {
        public Child()
        :base(string.Empty)
        {}

       public string Foo 
       {
        get 
        {
           return _foo;
         }
         set
         { 
           _foo = value;
          }
    }
}

So, as you can't instantiate an abstract class, you can create var obj = new Child() {Foo = "string"}; But you can choose this variant only if your MyBase just holds the foo value. However, if you can change Child you'd better add a constructor to it, as @Adam Houldsworth suggested.

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Thank you, but i dont want to use constructor in my child class is it possible? –  user1542287 Jul 27 '12 at 11:05
    
And what about my variant? Does it suitable for you? Or you can't use even a public Child() :base(string.Empy) {} ctor? –  Anton Sizikov Jul 27 '12 at 11:11
    
I can't use public Child():base(string.empty){} –  user1542287 Jul 27 '12 at 11:24
    
Hm, I'm sorry, but it's look like, there is no way to solve the problem :( –  Anton Sizikov Jul 27 '12 at 11:26

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