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The following code utilizes a destructor that modifies i. When the destructor is run, 2 is supposed to be stored into i yet when thing() returns we observe -1.

#include <stdio.h>

class Destruct {
    int &i;
public:
    Destruct(int &_i) : i(_i) {}
    ~Destruct() {
        i = 2;
    }
};

int thing() {
    int i = -1;
    Destruct d(i);
    return i;
}

int main() {
    printf("i: %d\n", thing());
}
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2 Answers 2

int thing() {
    int i = -1;
    Destruct d(i);
    return i;
}

The object d is destructed when the function returns, and the stack cleanup starts! By the time when the destructor is invoked, the returned value is already copied to the return register.

What you want to see, can be seen by doing this:

int thing() {
    int i = -1;
    {
        Destruct d(i);  //put it inside braces!
    }
    return i;
}

From your comment:

That is how it works, a disassembly of the code shows that this is the case. I am curious as to why.

The logic is straightforward, and it can be proven this way : suppose the destructor is called before i is copied to the return register, then why selectively destroy d and not i also? After all both are local variables.So if d is destructed, then i should be destructed as well, before its value is copied to the return register but that doesn't make sense.

And as @Luc Touraille asked (in the comment): "what if your function returned d? Are you sure you would like d to be destructed before being passed to the caller?"

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That is how it works, a disassembly of the code shows that this is the case. I am curious as to why. –  user1290696 Jul 27 '12 at 11:04
3  
@user1290696: Because destructing objects before the return statement would make no sense: what if your function returned d? Are you sure you would like d to be destructed before being passed to the caller? –  Luc Touraille Jul 27 '12 at 11:07

Because the destructor is executed after the copy has been made of i in the statement return i.

If you change your program by making the i in thing global and return by reference you'll see what you want.

#include <stdio.h>

int i = -1;
class Destruct {
    int &i;
public:
    Destruct(int &_i) : i(_i) {}
    ~Destruct() {
        i = 2;
    }
};

int& thing() {
    Destruct d(i);
    return i;
}

int main() {
    printf("i: %d\n", thing());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why changing to return by reference works? Why return by value is not showing the desired output? –  Green goblin Jul 27 '12 at 11:10
    
Because returning by value copies the value of i into another location. At this point in time the value is still -1. Then the destructor is executed changing the value of i in the object. The object's 'i' and the returned copy of i are different variables, with different locations in memory. Basically returning by value makes a copy, and returning by reference is just a reference to the original variable. Remember the destructor runs after effects of the return statement have been worked out. –  sashang Jul 27 '12 at 11:12

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