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I would like to make some javascript functions that perform parametric map/reduce jobs in mongo, but I'm getting confused about the scoping of JavaScript. For example, the following code gives me counts of the "gender" variable; i.e. it will tell me how many "male" and "female" records I have:

// count categories
db.responses.mapReduce(
    function(){
        emit(this["gender"], {count: 1})
    }, function(state, values){
        var result = {count: 0};
        values.forEach(function(value) {
            result.count += value.count;
        });
        return result;
    }, {out: { inline : 1}}
);

This works perfectly fine. In the next step I would like to create a function that does this for an arbitrary property

function countCategories(item) { 
    function mapper(it){
        fn = function(){
            if(this[it]){
                emit(this[it], {count: 1});
            }
        };
        return fn;
    }(item); 
    var reducer = function(state, values){
        var result = {count: 0};
        values.forEach(function(value) {
            result.count += value.count;
        });
        return result;
    };
    var out = {out: { inline : 1}};
    var results = db.responses.mapReduce(
        mapper, 
        reducer, 
        out
    );
    return results;
}   

countCategories("gender")

However when I try:

countCategories("gender")
{
    "results" : [ ],
    "timeMillis" : 48,
    "counts" : {
        "input" : 2462,
        "emit" : 0,
        "reduce" : 0,
        "output" : 0
    },
    "ok" : 1,
}

The emit function has never been called. What has gone wrong here? My guess is something with the scoping of the emit function that mongo supplies, but I'm not quite sure why it is not being called, nor throwing an error.

share|improve this question
    
You should not need the closure at all, item is defined in the scope of countCategories already. Why don't you just assign the fn to mapper? –  Bergi Jul 27 '12 at 11:29
    
Cause that didn't work... I changed the question a bit by the way. –  Jeroen Jul 27 '12 at 11:38
    
Sure, that's wasn't intended to be a solution... –  Bergi Jul 27 '12 at 11:51
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From what I read in the docs, the scope of functions to be used in database command is not their default javascript scope, but can (and must, if needed) be set manually. So, it think this should work:

var mapper = function(){
    if(item in this){
        emit(this[item], {count: 1});
    }
};
...
db.responses.mapReduce(
    mapper, 
    reducer, 
    {
       out: {"inline": 1},
       scope: {"item": item}
    }
);
share|improve this answer

I think you have a problem in the declaration of mapper:

Your code:

function mapper(it){
    fn = function(){
        if(this[it]){
            emit(this[it], {count: 1});
        }
    };
    return fn;
}(item); 

Is equivalent, due to the JavaScript syntax/hoisting/semicolon insertion stuff, to:

function mapper(it){
    fn = function(){
        if(this[it]){
            emit(this[it], {count: 1});
        }
    };
    return fn;
}

item; 

Your function statement declares a function that you want to execute immediately, but you don't.

And item; on it's own like that is perfectly ok JavaScript. It doesn't do anything, but it's valid. (Like "use strict";)

What you want is a function expression :

var mapper = (function (it){
    fn = function(){
        if(this[it]){
            emit(this[it], {count: 1});
        }
    };
    return fn;
})(item); 

The important part here is not having function at the start of line by itself. The () around the function expression aren't required, but it indicates that you execute the function immediately. They would be required if you didn't assign to a variable; to avoid starting a line with function.

share|improve this answer
    
He had this before - does not work. –  Bergi Jul 27 '12 at 12:19
    
@Bergi Well, at least this explains why you're not getting any errors. A lot of the inner functions fn are being created and tossed away without ever being called. –  Odalrick Jul 27 '12 at 12:28
    
I think the underlying problem here is that mongo is messing with the environment of the function to inject the emit() function in it's scope somehow. –  Jeroen Jul 27 '12 at 17:28

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