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I am looking for a javascript regex for whitespace. I am checking several different string in a loop and I need to locate the strings that have the big white space in them.

The white space string is built in a loop, like this...

please read this code as var whitespace = " " then the loop just concats more non breaking spaces on it.

var whitespace = " "

        for (var x = 0; x < 20; x++) {
            whitespace += "&nbsp;"
        }

then it is used later on in a string concat.

sometext += whitespace + someData;

I need to identify the strings that contain whitespace (20 spaces).

Or should I just be doing a contains(whitespace) or something similar.

Any help is appreciated.

Cheers, ~ck in San Diego

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have defined whitespace as 20 spaces, you can do

var input = whitespace + someData;
if(input.indexOf(whitespace) != -1)
{
   //input contains whitespace.
}

There is no need to use regex when you can do without it.

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Thanks Yogi!! By the way, how do you get my questions so fast? Whenever I ask a regex question, you answer it very quick. Is it twitter related or something? I was just curious. ~ck –  Hcabnettek Jul 22 '09 at 22:33
    
There is a questions feed on SO. Just set your RSS reader to it. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 22 '09 at 22:34
    
I get an email whenever you post a question! ;) Just kidding. I log in to SO every few hours and see if there are any questions which I can answer. –  SolutionYogi Jul 22 '09 at 22:40
    
Also, I looked at your past questions and it seems like you haven't accepted answers for quite a few of them. It will be nice if you can mark the answer which helped you solve the problem. –  SolutionYogi Jul 22 '09 at 22:41
    
I thought Twitter was likely a way of broadcasting the question. I need to sub to the RSS feed. Thanks guys! –  Hcabnettek Jul 22 '09 at 22:52
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For this specific question, Yogi is correct--you don't need regex and you're probably better off without it.

For future reference, if anyone else comes looking, regex has a special character for whitespace:

\s

In JS parlance (where regex literals may be enclosed in forward slashes) if you're looking for 20 spaces (not tabs, line feeds, etc.) you can do this:

/ {20}/

You'll also want to note that many browser regex engines do not consider the Non-Breaking SPace to be whitespace. The unicode representation for the NBSP character is:

\u00A0

Combined, looking for any combination of 20 whitespace characters (including tabs, etc.) OR NBSPs in a row (the square brackets denote a 'character class'):

/[\s\u00A0]{20}/

EDIT: Incorporating thomas' point about NBSP. Give his comment and/or answer an up-vote if you would--I know I have.

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1  
one could think so, but actually this is just plain wrong for too many browsers. –  citykid Mar 14 '13 at 15:44
    
Brilliant! The unicode code point for NBSP is exactly what I was looking for. This is useful for breaking a string into words: sentence.split(/[\s\u00A0]+/). –  thure Apr 9 '13 at 18:11
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At least IE and Chrome do NOT include char 160 (nbsp) in \s. A regex that includes it is

wsregex = /[\s|\u00A0]/

see also http://www.adamkoch.com/2009/07/25/white-space-and-character-160/ who reports about IE, but meanwhile chrome apparently also changed to not include it.

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For IE (I tested in IE7), \s does not match &nbsp; but Chrome and Firefox does. So if you want to eliminate white spaces but not &nbsp;(no break space), do not use \s as it is not browser safe.

For example, you want to eliminate all white spaces including \n \t but not &nbsp;, you can use \n \t and white space, that is: str.replace(/[\t \n]+/g, "")

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