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class MyClass(Object):

    def __init__(self, x=None):
        if x:
            self.x = x
    def do_something(self):
        print self.x

Now I have two objects

my_class1 = MyClass(x)

my_class2 = MyClass()

I want to use x when this my_class2 object is called

As other languages Support static variable like java,c++ etc.

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assign it as property to the class:

>>> class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self, x=None):
        if x is not None:
            self.__class__.x = x
    def do_something(self):
        print self.x  # or self.__class__.x, to avoid getting instance property

>>> my_class1 = MyClass('aaa')
>>> my_class2 = MyClass()
>>> my_class2.do_something()
aaa
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thanks that was excellent –  Ch Zeeshan Jul 27 '12 at 12:11
    
@ChZeeshan: You are welcome. –  Tadeck Jul 27 '12 at 12:13
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There are no static variables in Python, but you can use the class variables for that. Here is an example:

class MyClass(object):
    x = 0

    def __init__(self, x=None):
        if x:
            MyClass.x = x

    def do_something(self):
        print "x:", self.x

c1 = MyClass()
c1.do_something()
>> x: 0

c2 = MyClass(10)
c2.do_something()
>> x: 10

c3 = MyClass()
c3.do_something()
>> x: 10

When you call self.x - it looks first for instance-level variable, instantiated as self.x, and if not found - then looks for Class.x. So you can define it on class level, but override it on instance level.

A widely-used example is to use a default class variable with possible override into instance:

class MyClass(object):
    x = 0

    def __init__(self, x=None):
        self.x = x or MyClass.x

    def do_something(self):
        print "x:", self.x

c1 = MyClass()
c1.do_something()
>> x: 0

c2 = MyClass(10)
c2.do_something()
>> x: 10

c3 = MyClass()
c3.do_something()
>> x: 0
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You cannot. You can use a class attribute instead:

class Klass:
   Attr = 'test'

# access it (readonly) through the class instances:
x = Klass()
y = Klass()
x.Attr
y.Attr

Read more about Python classes.

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But I need to set value of x at run time. is there any other way to do this? –  Ch Zeeshan Jul 27 '12 at 12:05
    
@ChZeeshan: Yes, you can assign it to the class, not instance. –  Tadeck Jul 27 '12 at 12:07
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