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I've got the following code which makes a connection to a db > runs a stored proc > and then moves on.

I believe it is easy to get db programming wrong so it is important to be defensive: is the following defensive? (or can it be improved?)

public int RunStoredProc()
{
SqlConnection conn = null;
SqlCommand dataCommand = null;
SqlParameter param = null;
int myOutputValue;

try
{
    conn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["IMS"].ConnectionString);                  
    conn.Open();
    dataCommand = conn.CreateCommand();
    dataCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    dataCommand.CommandText = "pr_blahblah";
    dataCommand.CommandTimeout = 200; //seconds
    param = new SqlParameter();
    param = dataCommand.Parameters.Add("@NumRowsReturned", SqlDbType.Int);
    param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;
    dataCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    myOutputValue = (int)param.Value;

    return myOutputValue;
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Error:" + ex.Number.ToString(), "Error StoredProcedure");
    return 0;
}
finally
{
    if (conn != null)
    {
        conn.Close();
        conn.Dispose();
    }
}
}

CODE NOW LOOKS LIKE THE FOLLOWING

I've tried to use all the help offered by everyone and the above code has now been amended to the following which I hope is now sufficiently defensive:

public SqlConnection CreateConnection()
{
    SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["IMS"].ConnectionString);
    return conn;
}
public int RunStoredProc()
{
    using (var conn = CreateConnection())
    using (var dataCommand = conn.CreateCommand()) 
    {
            conn.Open();
            dataCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            dataCommand.CommandText = "pr_BankingChargebacks";
            dataCommand.CommandTimeout = 200; //5 minutes
            SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter();
            param = dataCommand.Parameters.Add("@NumRowsReturned", SqlDbType.Int);
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;
            dataCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
            int myOutputValue = (int)param.Value;

            return myOutputValue;

    } 
}
share|improve this question
    
ideally you should dispose of the command object as well. – Marlon Jul 27 '12 at 11:50
    
looking for problems as I've had to create a whole new project; the old one seems to have a bug in it that I can't find.. like something is going on in the background; even in the .cs code files if I want to scroll up and down everything is delayed sort of dragging – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 11:53
2  
I also have issues with MessageBox.Show; doesn't that halt the thread until the user clicks "OK" keeping the connection open indefinitely if the user happened to go away from keyboard? – Chris Sinclair Jul 27 '12 at 11:53
1  
@ChrisSinclair +1 other people have also mentioned this and I'm now dealing with it – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 12:07
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try using, well, the using construct for such things.

using(var conn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["IMS"].ConnectionString)
{
}

Once you do that, I think you will be at the right level of "defense". Similarly try to do the same for anything that has to be disposed ( like the command)

share|improve this answer
3  
Indeed (I would also highlight that the command needs to be disposed too) – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '12 at 11:51
    
thanks - will this deal with the command object aswell? I assume the command object can only exist within the scope of the using so will be collected aswell? – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 11:54
    
@marc Gravell ...so have a seperate using nested within the above for the command object? – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 11:55
    
@whytheq - You can have a similar using statement inside the outer one. – manojlds Jul 27 '12 at 11:55
  • There is no need to call both .Close() and .Dispose()
  • Prefer the using block instead of try-finally
  • Dispose of the command object
  • I would remove the catch clause. It doesn't belong here (though YMMV).

If you are going to write this code all over the place, stop. At least create a small helper class to do this, or use a light-weight 'ORM' like massive, dapper or petapoco. For an example of an ADO.Net helper class, see https://github.com/jhgbrt/yadal/blob/master/YaDal/YaDal.cs

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks; I'll add my attempt at the correct code - with what I think is a helper method in the OP – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 14:02

The main thing I would notice is a MessageBox in database-access code. I can't think of a single scenario that is useful. Just let the exception rise. Don't catch that.

As a general template:

using(var conn = CreateConnection())
using(var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
{
    // setup cmd and the parameters
    conn.Open();
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    // post-process cmd parameters (out/return/etc)
}

Note: no Close(), no catch; all the finally are handled by the using. Much simpler; much harder to get wrong.

Another thing to emphasise is the use of a factory method for creating the connection; don't put:

new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["IMS"].ConnectionString)

into every method; after all... that could change, and it is unnecessary repetition.

share|improve this answer
    
nice one for the help...as a newbie I'm unsure of what you mean by "Another thing to emphasise is the use of a factory method for creating the connection" - how do I do this? – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 12:02
    
"much harder to get wrong." ...excellent line – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 12:05
    
ok - so this line of yours var conn = CreateConnection())is what you are describing by "factory method" ? – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 12:07
    
@whytheq by writing a method such as CreateConnection, and calling it from the various places that currently do new SqlConnection(...) – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '12 at 12:07
    
@whytheq if you wrap it up in a method such as CreateConnection(), then yes – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '12 at 12:07

If MessageBox.Show("Error:" + ex.Number.ToString(), "Error StoredProcedure"); is how you're going to handle an exception then you're not logging or even retrieving the actual exception details.

share|improve this answer
    
I shortened the code for this quetion – whytheq Jul 27 '12 at 12:00

In addition to manojlds's advice I recommend that you make yourself some reusable helper methods to call the database. For example, make yourself a method that reads the connection string, creates the connection and opens it. Don't repeat infrastructure stuff everywhere.

You can do the same for invoking an sproc or a command text.

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