Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does following code not throws exception?

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public class MainRunner {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> s = new ArrayList<String>() {
        {
        add("a");
        add("1");
        add("1");
        }
    };
    // List<Integer> i = (List<Integer>) listConvertor(s, new Integer("1"));
    List<Integer> i = (List<Integer>) listConvertor(s, Integer.class);
    System.out.println(i);
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T, P> List<?> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, P outputClass) {
    List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
    for (T t : inputList) {
        outputList.add((P) t); // shouldn't be classCastException here?
    }

    return outputList;

    }

}

I want to return List<P> instead of List<?> . But when I write List<P> , it means List<Class<P>> . i.e. in above case , it means List<Class<Integer>> , but I want List<Integer> as return.

I want below code: (so that i don't have to cast again at when method returns)

List<Integer> i =   listConvertor(s, Integer.class);
        System.out.println(i);
        }

        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public static <T, P> List<P> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, P outputClass) {
        List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
        for (T t : inputList) {
            outputList.add((P) t); // shouldn't be classCastException here?
        }

        return outputList;

        }

    }
share|improve this question
    
You're not returning List<T> –  Tom Dignan Jul 27 '12 at 11:55
2  
Why should it throw any? –  biziclop Jul 27 '12 at 11:55
    
your question title should ask to return List<P> instead of List<T>, no? –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should do the job with minimal fuss:

public static <T, P> List<P> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, Class<P> outputClass) {
    List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
    for (T t : inputList) {
        if( !outputClass.isInstance(t) )
            throw new ClassCastException("Faked CCException");
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        P p = (P) t;
        outputList.add(p);
    }

    return outputList;
}
  • no cast on the caller side
  • exception if inappropriate types are in the source list.
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't solve incompatible types, though :) if the OP really wants to convert String to Integer then this doesn't help... –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 12:45
    
BTW: it also doesn't work when converting two different numeric types (ie. Double to Integer) it will only work for parent inheritance and not siblings, etc. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 12:51
    
Strictly speaking: The question is about three things: Return type not List<?>, no cast on caller side and why there is no ClassCastException in the marked place. Whether or not a real String to Integer conversion is expected is not clear. The method name might be an "artefact" since the TO did not specify much more than the exception. –  A.H. Jul 27 '12 at 12:51
    
Of course, but since this is clearly an example, the question is about having List<a> be converted to a working List<b>. And, even if you solution may work, in my opinion, does not solve the real problem behind the question. Note that I didn't downvote your answer too. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 12:53
public static <T, P> List<P> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, Class<P> outputClass) {

remember, you are passing a Class Object, not an Integer Object.

share|improve this answer
    
this won't work. It will still not throw an exception, but getting any item from the list will throw a ClassCastException then. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 12:24

No, of course it does not throw an exception. Generics are for compile time checks, not run-time. At run time, all your lists are List<Object> and the cast is made implicitly by the JVM.


Edit : in your code,

for (T t : inputList) {
  outputList.add((P) t); // shouldn't be classCastException here?
}

is actually compiled to

for (Object t : inputList) {
  outputList.add((Object) t); // shouldn't be classCastException here? -- no
}

For example, with your code, if you do i.get(0).getClass() you will then get a ClassCastException as the item cannot be converted from String to Integer.class (note: the same would apply however you do it as you cannot implicitly cast a String to an Integer. Period.)

If this is really what you want to do, cast T to P (for example, cast strings to a numeric value), then I suggest you use another pattern. For example :

static interface ClassConverter<F,T> {
    public T convert(F o);
}

static class StringToIntConverter implements ClassConverter<String,Integer> {
    public Integer convert(String o) {
        try {
            return Integer.parseInt(o);
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> s = new ArrayList<String>() {
        {
        add("a");
        add("1");
        add("1");
        }
    };
    // List<Integer> i = (List<Integer>) listConvertor(s, new Integer("1"));
    List<Integer> i = (List<Integer>) listConvertor(s, new StringToIntConverter());
    System.out.println(i);
    System.out.println(i.get(0).getClass().getName());
}

public static <T, P> List<P> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, ClassConverter<T, P> c) {
    List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
    for (T t : inputList) {
        outputList.add(c.convert(t)); // cast handled by the class method == safer
    }

    return outputList;
}

Than all you need to do is implement the ClassConverter interface to any types you wish to covert T to P and pass it to your listConverter method.

share|improve this answer
    
String and Integer classes are just example. I am doing more generic , any object to any object. anyway, thanks for this approach. –  Priyank Doshi Jul 27 '12 at 13:13
    
well, just implement the ClassConverter interface to the objects you wish to convert to. The StringToIntConverter was just an example too, BTW :) –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 13:16
    
you can't just convert any object to any object in a generic way... or at least you can call toString() and convert any object to String (or Object) but not any T to any P without any specialized converter –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 13:18
    
You can, if you are backed by 'Dozer' .. ! –  Priyank Doshi Jul 27 '12 at 16:10
    
that wasn't mentioned in the question. And, frankly, for most use cases, Dozer is truly overkill, IMO. I have personally never found a situation where I needed to use such library. Are you really using Dozer already? If not, you probably don't need it. –  Yanick Rochon Jul 27 '12 at 16:56
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class MainRunner {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> s = new ArrayList<String>() {
      {
        add("a");
        add("1");
        add("1");
      }
    };

    List<Integer> i = listConvertor(s, Integer.class);
    System.out.println(i);
  }

  public static <T, P> List<P> listConvertor(List<T> inputList, Class<P> outputClass) {
    List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
    for (T t : inputList) {
      outputList.add((P) t); // shouldn't be classCastException here?
    }

    return outputList;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Same as @A.H.'s answer, but much simplified using Class.cast(), and also got rid of the unnecessary T:

public static <P> List<P> listConvertor(List<?> inputList, Class<P> outputClass) {
    List<P> outputList = new ArrayList<P>(inputList.size());
    for (Object t : inputList) {
        P p = outputClass.cast(t);
        outputList.add(p);
    }

    return outputList;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.