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I have a variety of PHP scripts that use the mysqli suite of functions to access a database. I have wrote these scripts to handle the various error conditions (e.g. mysqli_stmt_execute returning false).

Is there a simple way of faking these error conditions to verifty that the output received by the user is approproiate for these conditions?

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Tip of the hat Sire! –  nickl- Aug 30 '12 at 2:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

If you are using the mysqli classes.

for example:

<?php
     $mysqli = new mysqli("localhost", "user", "password", "db");
     $query = "INSERT INTO some_table (some_field) VALUES ('some_vale')";
     $stmt = $mysqli->prepare($query);
     if (false === $stmt->execute()) {
         echo "Oops! some_value for same_field in some_table returned false";
     }

Mock the classes and overwrite statement execute.

<?php
    class my_mysqli extends mysqli
    {
        public function prepare ($query)
        {
            return new my_mysqli_stmt();
        }

    }

    class my_mysqli_stmt extends mysqli_stmt {
        public function execute ()
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

all you need to change to have every execute method return false is:

<?php
     $mysqli = new my_mysqli("localhost", "user", "password", "db");

If you're using the functions instead

for example:

<?php
     $mysqli = mysqli_connect("localhost", "user", "password", "db");
     $query = "INSERT INTO some_table (some_field) VALUES ('some_vale')";
     $stmt = mysqli_prepare($mysqli, $query);
     if (false === mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt)) {
         echo "Oops! some_value for same_field in some_table returned false";
     }

Monkey patch in namespace php >= 5.3

<?php
    namespace my_faking_namespace {
        function mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt) 
        {
            return false;    
        }

        $mysqli = mysqli_connect("localhost", "user", "password", "db");
        $query = "INSERT INTO some_table (some_field) VALUES ('some_vale')";
        $stmt = mysqli_prepare($mysqli, $query);
        if (false === mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt)) {
            echo "Oops! some_value for same_field in some_table returned false";
        }
    }

Your script will be calling my_faking_namespace\mysqli_stmt_execute() instead of the php version.

note: this wont work if you are calling the functions like \mysqli_stmt_execute() as this version explicitly calls the global namespace.

The not so easy alternatives, for completion purposes

These modify the functions at the call stack level, altering php internally through the use of custom extension modules (requires installation).

  • Advanced PHP debugger has override_function() and rename_function()
  • runkit has runkit_function_copy, runkit_function_redefine, runkit_function_remove, runkit_function_rename and can change just about anything you desire.

nJoy!

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If you are looking for automate testing, the best way to go (with PHP) is PHPUnit.

With PHPUnit you can write unit tests (assertions in particular) which allow you to verify that the output received by the user is appropriate in every different condition.

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If you're not in a production environment, the best way to do it is changing the various Database parameters in your PHP.

  • Change the database password to see how you handle connection errors
  • Modify you table structures to see how you deal with query errors
  • Try to see what happens with special characters (ex: буква) in your queries
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These are all valid test cases but does it answer the question? These are all real conditions you physically applied, there is no faking involved. –  nickl- Aug 26 '12 at 6:49
    
@nickl- In my opinion it's the closest way. Changing the port number will fake a connection error. Changing tables structure will fake a query error. The objective is to test that "the output received by the user is approproiate for these conditions" it will be good enough. –  iMat Aug 26 '12 at 14:38
    
what you are not considering is the fact that these are not once off tests, you will have to do this whole hop, skip and jump for every release. With the mocks you can check after every commit. There is no way you can cover every scenario pulling out cables and dropping tables, with the mocks there is no way we are going to miss anything. =) –  nickl- Aug 26 '12 at 18:55
    
@nickl- I never thought about such solution. It's a great method –  iMat Aug 26 '12 at 23:53

Maybe you're asking the wrong question: Why does your core business logic depend on third-party libraries/APIs? Have you heard of the so-called onion architecture? Layering your application more along those lines--domain, business, infrastructure/tests--gives you a much easier time testing the things that won't change: your business logic.

However, since PHP is a dynamic typed language, mocking is essentially free. As long as you're using OO features and not the global functions, all you need to create testable code is a way to inject a fake database handle into your code. A great way is to add a $db parameter to your functions/methods. Something trivial like this:

function updateStuff($rowIds, $newValues, $db) { ... }

Then, in your unit-tests that cover updateStuff, pass in a mock object as the $db parameter.

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