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The X: What I want to do:

I have the types: BaseType and DerivedType<int k> (see code below), and I need to handle a collection of K vectors of the derived types std::vector<DerivedType<k>>, k = 1...K. I'd like to access the objects in these vectors, and perform an operation on them that depends on k. K is a compile time constant. The problem is illustrated in the implementation:

The types are defined as:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

struct BaseType { // Interface of the DerivedTypes
  virtual void print(){std::cout << "BaseType!" << std::endl; }
};

template< int k >
struct DerivedType : public BaseType {
  static const int k_ = k;
  // ... function calls templated on k ...
  void print(){std::cout << "DerivedType: " << k_ << std::endl;}
};

template< int k >
void doSomething ( DerivedType<k>& object ) { object.print(); }

And what I want to do is:

int main() {

  // My collection of vectors of the derived types:
  std::vector<DerivedType<0>> derType0(2);
  std::vector<DerivedType<1>> derType1(1);
  std::vector<DerivedType<2>> derType2(3);
  // ... should go to K: std::vector<DerivedType<K>> derTypeK;

  // Iterate over the derived objects applying a k-dependent templated function:
  std::for_each(begin(derType0),end(derType0),[](DerivedType<0>& object){
    doSomething<0>(object);
  });
  std::for_each(begin(derType1),end(derType1),[](DerivedType<1>& object){
    doSomething<1>(object);
  });
  std::for_each(begin(derType2),end(derType2),[](DerivedType<2>& object){
    doSomething<2>(object);
  });

  return 0;
}

I want to avoid repeating code, such that I only have to change K, which is a compile time constant of O(10). Ideally, I would have something "more like" this:

// Pseudocode: do not try to compile this

create_derived_objects(DerivedType,K)
  = std::vector< std::vector<DerivedType<k>>* > my_K_derived_types;                                                  

for each vector<DerivedType<k>>* derivedTypes in my my_K_derived_types
  for each object in (*derivedTypes)
    doSomething<k> on object of type derivedType<k>
    // I could also restrict doSomething<k> to the base interface

Each vector of derived types contains O(10^6) to O(10^9) objects. The inner-most loops are the most time consuming part of my application making dynamic_cast only an option for the outer-most loop.

The Y: what I have tryed without succes.

I am at the moment studying the Abrahams C++ Template Metaprogramming book to see if I could use boost::mpl. I am also doing the tutorials on boost::fusion to see if I could use it too. However, the learning curve of these libraries is rather large, so I wanted to ask first before I invest a week in something when a better and simpler solution is available.

My first try was to wrapp my vectors std::vector<DerivedType<k>> such that I can create a vector<WrappedDerivedTypes*>, and access each of the single vectors separately within a for_each loop. However, in the loop I have a series of if(dynamic_cast<std::vector<DerivedType<0>>>(WrappedVector) != 0 ){ do for_each loop for the derived objects } else if( dynamic_cast...) { do...} ... that I wasn't able to eliminate.

share|improve this question
1  
Can your doSomething function just take a reference to BaseType? The implementation you show does not depend on the k template parameter. – quamrana Jul 27 '12 at 13:00
1  
Further to what quamrana suggests: why not just make doSomething() a virtual method, and explicitly specialise it for each derived type? Then you could just store your k vectors in a vector-of-vectors of pointer-toBaseType. (You would need a "factory method" to construct each DerivedType<k> object initially, but thereafter they can be treated uniformly via the parent BaseType type.) As it stands, I don't see what is gained by making DerivedType<k> derive from BaseType. – j_random_hacker Jul 27 '12 at 13:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

What about a recursive solution based on a generic linked list of vectors, a strategy pattern and a thing that applies strategies recursively through the linked list? (note: see the improved version at the end):

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template <int j>
class holder {
public:
    const static int k = j;
};

template <int j>
class strategy {
public:
    void operator()(holder<j> t)
    {
        std::cout << "Strategy " << t.k << std::endl;
    }
};

template <int k>
class lin_vector {
private:
    std::vector<holder<k>> vec;
    lin_vector<k-1> pred;
public:
    lin_vector(const lin_vector<k-1> &pred, std::vector<holder<k>> vec)
        : vec(vec), pred(pred) { }
    std::vector<holder<k>> get_vec() { return vec; }
    lin_vector<k-1> &get_pred() { return pred; }
};

template <>
class lin_vector<0> {
public:
    lin_vector() { }
};

template <int k, template <int> class strategy>
class apply_strategy {
public:
    void operator()(lin_vector<k> lin);
};

template <int k, template <int> class strategy>
void apply_strategy<k, strategy>::operator()(lin_vector<k> lin)
{
    apply_strategy<k-1, strategy>()(lin.get_pred());
    for (auto i : lin.get_vec())
    strategy<k>()(i);
}

template <template <int> class strategy>
class apply_strategy<0, strategy>
{
public:
    void operator()(lin_vector<0> lin) { /* does nothing */ } 
};


template <int k>
lin_vector<k> build_lin()
{
    return lin_vector<k>(build_lin<k-1>(), {holder<k>()});
}

template <>
lin_vector<0> build_lin()
{
    return lin_vector<0>();
}

int main(void)
{
    apply_strategy<5, strategy>()(build_lin<5>());
}

Compile it with a C++11 compiler. Most probably you'll find unsatisfactory the fact that building a lin_vector requires a lot of copying, but you can specialize the structure to suit your needs (perhaps substituting the pred with a pointer or embedding the creation strategy straight into the linked list).

EDIT: here there is an improved version which avoids a lot of copying and handles list building and processing in a more coherent and uniform way:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template <int j>
class holder {
public:
    const static int k = j;
};

template <int k>
class lin_vector {
private:
    std::vector<holder<k>> vec;
    lin_vector<k-1> pred;
public:
    std::vector<holder<k>> &get_vec() { return vec; }
    lin_vector<k-1> &get_pred() { return pred; }
};

template <>
class lin_vector<0> {
public:
    lin_vector() { }
};

template <int k, template <int> class strategy>
class apply_strategy {
public:
    void operator()(lin_vector<k> &lin);
};

template <int k, template <int> class strategy>
void apply_strategy<k, strategy>::operator()(lin_vector<k> &lin)
{
    apply_strategy<k-1, strategy>()(lin.get_pred());
    strategy<k>()(lin.get_vec());
}

template <template <int> class strategy>
class apply_strategy<0, strategy>
{
public:
    void operator()(lin_vector<0> &lin) { /* does nothing */ } 
};

template <int j>
class strategy {
public:
    void operator()(std::vector<holder<j>> &t)
    {
        std::cout << "Strategy " << j << ", elements: ";
        for (auto v : t)
            std::cout << v.k << " ";
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
};

template <int j>
class build_strategy {
public:
    void operator()(std::vector<holder<j>> &t)
    {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < j; i++)
            t.push_back(holder<j>());
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    const int K = 5;
    lin_vector<K> list;
    apply_strategy<K, build_strategy>()(list);
    apply_strategy<K, strategy>()(list);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This basic design could be improved up a little, especially about the lin_list thing. A good idea could be to leave default-inizialized the vector and then fill the vectors using the apply_strategy idea. In this way you'll end up with a generic structure which is easily constructed (just write lin_lis<k> l and you are fine) and which is independent on the policy used to fill the vectors. – akappa Jul 27 '12 at 14:14
    
Wow! Really nice answer! Thank you a lot ! In order to avoid copying the vectors around I've changed the linked list of vectors into a linked list of vector pointers. That way only the vector pointers need to be copied. What do you mean by substituting the pred with a pointer? As far as I understood, pred contains the previous node (with his corresponding vector, or vector pointer). Is that right? – gnzlbg Jul 27 '12 at 14:43
1  
Yes, that's right. BTW, I think the new version is better: basically a lin_list<K> is a linked list of empty vectors, and then you fill the vectors by defining a policy. No copying needed at all, your building policy is neatly enclosed and you can stack-allocate everything. – akappa Jul 27 '12 at 14:45
1  
I'm not really an expert of template programming, but I find the classic of Alexandrescu mind-blowing at that: amazon.com/Modern-Design-Generic-Programming-Patterns/dp/… – akappa Jul 27 '12 at 14:48
1  
Thanks a lot again! – gnzlbg Jul 27 '12 at 15:44

A solution free of virtual dispatch is possible, though it's probably overkill.

The first thing you need is a function template doSomething<K>() that you specialise on each derived type:

template <int K>
void doSomething(vector<DerivedType<K> >& x);

template <>
void doSomething<1>(vector<DerivedType<1> >& x) { ... }

template <>
void doSomething<2>(vector<DerivedType<2> >& x) { ... }   // etc.

You could then build a strongly-typed collection of vectors using a recursively defined struct template:

template <int K>
struct vov {
    vov<K - 1> prev;
    vector<DerivedType<K> > v;
};

template <>
struct vov<1> {
    vector<DerivedType<1> > v;
};

Finally, you can write a recursive function template to process this structure:

template <int K>
void process(vov<K>& x) {
    doSomething(x.v);     // Type inference will find the right doSomething()
    process(x.prev);      // Here too
}

template <>
void process<1>(vov<1>& x) {
    doSomething(x.v);
}

Now the main code will look like:

vov<42> foo;
process(foo);

Because the process() function call performs iteration through the use of recursion, it will probably use K stack frames unnecessarily; however it is tail recursion, which modern optimising C++ compilers can usually convert into plain iteration with no stack wastage. Using tail recursion forces us to process the vectors in "reverse" order, so that the DerivedType<1> vector is processed last, but if necessary this could be fixed with a slightly more elaborate template using 2 int template parameters (one will "count up" towards the other, instead of a single int parameter that "counts down" towards 1).

Observe that there is no benefit gained by deriving each DerivedType<k> from BaseType in this solution -- you may as well forget about BaseType altogether, unless you need it for a different reason.

There may well be MPL primitives that simplify some of these processes -- if anyone knows them, please feel free to edit.

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