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I'm creating (learning) an extension for Google Chrome.

To debug some code, I inserted console.log(), as follows:

var fourmTabs = new Array();
chrome.tabs.query({}, function (tabs) {
    for (var i = 0; i < tabs.length; i++) {
        fourmTabs[i] = tabs[i];
    }
});
for (var i = 0; i < fourmTabs.length; i++) {
    if (fourmTabs[i] != null)
        window.console.log(fourmTabs[i].url);
    else {
        window.console.log("??" + i);
    }
}

It's very simple code: get all tabs info into an array of my own, and print some things.

To check whether the code works as it should, I run the code. Here comes the problem:

  • When I use breakpoints (via the Developer tools), the code runs fine.
  • Without breakpoints, nothing is printed.

Any idea why?

share|improve this question
    
thanks for the links, i understand the problem but im not sure how to fix it. can u give some ideas? or mybee some sample code on how will u do it? –  samy Jul 27 '12 at 13:23
    
The key is "Properly rewrite your code, to correctly implement the asynchronous aspect" (quoted my answer). What part do you not understand? Do you know the difference between synchronous and asynchronous programming? –  Rob W Jul 27 '12 at 13:37
    
im still learning javascript and i guess i didnt got to this part yet. can u give me some refrences, or a simple code in the chrome extenstion area? –  samy Jul 27 '12 at 13:43
    
What do you want to know? Do you know the meaning of asynchronous and synchronous? Are you failing to see how your code relates to the async problem? If you ask a question, please include relevant details. Guessing is not very productive. –  Rob W Jul 27 '12 at 13:46
    
sorry about that(silly me), i do want to unserstand how my code is failing. and how i solve the async problem. (thank for u the link) :) –  samy Jul 27 '12 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Your problem can be simplified to:

/*1.*/ var fourmTabs = [];
/*2.*/ chrome.tabs.query({}, function(tabs) {
/*3.*/     fourmTabs[0] = tabs[0];
/*4.*/ });
/*5.*/ console.log(fourmTabs[0]);

You expect that the fourmTabs array is updated (by line 3) when line 5 is reached.
That is wrong, because the chrome.tabs.query method is asynchronous.


In an attempt to make you understand the significance of the asynchronous aspect, I show a code snippet with the same structure as your code and a story.

/*1.*/ var rope = null;
/*2.*/ requestRope(function(receivedRope) {
/*3.*/     rope = receivedRope;
/*4.*/ });
/*5.*/ grab(rope);
  • At line 1, the presence of a rope is announced.
  • At lines 2-4, a callback function is created, which ought to be called by the requestRope function.
  • At line 5, you're going to grab the rope via the grab function.

When requestRope is implemented synchronously, there's no problem:
  You: "Hi, I want a rope. Please throw the rope"call the callback function" when you've got one."
  She: "Sure." throws rope
  You: Jumps and grabs rope - You manage to get at the other side, alive.

When requestRope is implemented asynchronously, you may have a problem if you treat it as synchronous:
  You: "Please throw a rope at me."
  She: "Sure. Let's have a look..."
  You: Jumps and attempts to grab rope Because there's no rope, you fall and die.
  She: Throws rope Too late, of course.


Now you've seen the difference between an asynchronously and synchronously implemented function, let's solve your original question:

var fourmTabs = new Array();
chrome.tabs.query({}, function (tabs) {
    for (var i = 0; i < tabs.length; i++) {
        fourmTabs[i] = tabs[i];
    }
    // Moved code inside the callback handler
    for (var i = 0; i < fourmTabs.length; i++) {
        if (fourmTabs[i] != null)
           window.console.log(fourmTabs[i].url);
        else {
            window.console.log("??" + i);
        }
    }
});
// <moved code inside callback function of chrome.tabs.query>

With breakpoints, your code works, because by the time that the second part of the code is reached, the callback has already been called.

share|improve this answer
1  
wow! thank u!.now, i understand that i need to wait, befor getting the data into my arry. the rope example is great but, can u show me (if is not so hard) how will u make sure she will throw me the rope befor i jump into my death? –  samy Jul 27 '12 at 14:37
3  
@samy Simply jump after receiving the rope. The "jump logic" has to be appended to the callback function. I've added the code for your case at the end of the answer, I hope that you understand it now :) –  Rob W Jul 27 '12 at 14:41
2  
ohhhh, i see the diffrence now. now i understnad! thank u very much!! for taking the time and making me understand this topic :) –  samy Jul 27 '12 at 14:44
8  
This answer is legendary! –  Adnan Jul 29 '12 at 15:23
    
one of the best answers on Stackoverflow. –  doniyor Aug 10 at 23:31

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