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I have a VideoRenderer class, which inherits an Image control, a MyVideo class, which has a VideoRenderer instance, and a RenderFrames method in MainWindow code-behind

I've attached the relevant sections of those classes, as well as the RenderFrames method and a bit of the MainWindow code-behind constructor below.

VideoRenderer receives external video and generates video frames as Bitmap objects, stored in the "bitmap" field. After each finished process, I store a clone of the bitmap in the field "bitmapCopy".

MyVideo controls when the VideoRenderer instance, "sharedVideoRenderer", starts and stops receiving and sending frames to MainWindow RenderFrames method, passing the VideoRenderer instance as an object parameter, using ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem.

RenderFrames loops until MyVideo says to stop by changing either of its bool "are we rendering" properties, and it does a conversion from Bitmap -> BitmapImage -> Image.Source, and then sets VideoContentControl.Content as the image, using the MainWindow Dispatcher.

Everything works, and video is renderered, but GUI control is essentially frozen, other buttons and things don't work, as dispatching the entire operations onto the MainWindow thread and looping constantly is tying up the thread.

My question is this: What other methods might I try to transport Bitmap frames from "sharedVideoRenderer" to VideoContentControl, and keep updating it with new images, without freezing the GUI?

Any help would be appreciated.

Relevant code:

VideoRenderer.cs:

internal void DrawBitmap()
{
    lock (bitmapLock)
    {
        bitmapCopy = (Bitmap)bitmap.Clone();
    }
}

MyVideo.cs:

public static void RenderVideoPreview()
{
    sharedVideoRenderer.VideoObject = videoPreview;

    sharedVideoRenderer.Start();

    videoPreviewIsRendering = true;

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((Application.Current.MainWindow as MainWindow).RenderFrames, sharedVideoRenderer);
    }

MainWindow.xaml.cs:

Dispatcher mainWindowDispatcher;

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    mainWindowDispatcher = this.Dispatcher;
...

public void RenderFrames(object videoRenderer)
{
    while (MyVideo.VideoPreviewIsRendering || MyVideo.LiveSessionParticipantVideoIsRendering)
    {
        mainWindowDispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                System.Drawing.Bitmap bitmap;

                bitmap = (videoRenderer as VideoRenderer).BitmapCopy;

                using (MemoryStream memory = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
                    ImageSource imageSource;
                    Image image;
                    image = new Image();

                    bitmap.Save(memory, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);

                    memory.Position = 0;

                    bitmapImage.BeginInit();
                    bitmapImage.StreamSource = memory;
                    bitmapImage.CacheOption = BitmapCacheOption.OnLoad;
                    bitmapImage.EndInit();

                    imageSource = bitmapImage;

                    image.Source = imageSource;

                    VideoContentControl.Content = image;

                    memory.Close();
                }
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {

            }
        }));
    }

    mainWindowDispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            VideoContentControl.ClearValue(ContentProperty);

            VideoContentControl.InvalidateVisual();
        }));
}
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I think you need to take advantage of the GPU to make this work reliably. – Kos Jul 27 '12 at 15:33
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((Application.Current.MainWindow as MainWindow).RenderFrames, sharedVideoRenderer);

////    

public void RenderFrames(object videoRenderer)
{
    while (MyVideo.VideoPreviewIsRendering || MyVideo.LiveSessionParticipantVideoIsRendering)
    {
        mainWindowDispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>

These lines are causing the pain I guess.

Although the Renderframes method is called on a threadpool thread, the main thing it does is passing control back to the UI thread and thus claiming/blocking it.

You could try and find a smaller scope:

while (MyVideo.VideoPreviewIsRendering || MyVideo.LiveSessionParticipantVideoIsRendering)
{

        try
        {
            System.Drawing.Bitmap bitmap;

            bitmap = (videoRenderer as VideoRenderer).BitmapCopy;

            using (MemoryStream memory = new MemoryStream())
            {
                BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
                ImageSource imageSource;
                Image image;
                image = new Image();

                bitmap.Save(memory, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);

                memory.Position = 0;

                bitmapImage.BeginInit();
                bitmapImage.StreamSource = memory;
                bitmapImage.CacheOption = BitmapCacheOption.OnLoad;
                bitmapImage.EndInit();

                imageSource = bitmapImage;

                mainWindowDispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>
                {
                    image.Source = imageSource;

                    VideoContentControl.Content = image;

                    memory.Close();
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

        }
    }));
}

I am not quite sure I changed the scope too little or too much because I don't really know what belongs to the UI thread but this might give you a start and you might want to move things around.

Another trick you could/should use is to minimize the number of UI Elements you are making. In the current code you are creating an Image element every frame. You could, instead, make a single WriteableBitmap, point the an Image's ImageSource to it and simply blit the picture data to it. See: What is a fast way to generate and draw video in WPF?

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