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I have a List<Tuple<A,B>> and would like to know if there is a way in LINQ to return Tuple<List<A>,List<B>>

This is similar to the following Python question: Unpacking a list / tuple of pairs into two lists / tuples

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use Aggregate:

Tuple<List<A>, List<B>> Unpack<A, B>(List<Tuple<A, B>> list)
{
    return list.Aggregate(Tuple.Create(new List<A>(list.Count), new List<B>(list.Count)),
                          (unpacked, tuple) =>
                          {
                              unpacked.Item1.Add(tuple.Item1);
                              unpacked.Item2.Add(tuple.Item2);
                              return unpacked;
                          });
}
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It's not possible with a single LINQ call, however you can do it quite easily with code:

Tuple<List<A>, List<B>> Unpack<A, B>(List<Tuple<A, B>> list)
{
  var listA = new List<A>(list.Count);
  var listB = new List<B>(list.Count);
  foreach (var t in list)
  {
    listA.Add(t.Item1);
    listB.Add(t.Item2);
  }

  return Tuple.Create(listA, listB);
}
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3  
This is probably the most simple way of doing it without enumerating over the list twice. –  vcsjones Jul 27 '12 at 14:03
4  
@Aducci Yes, you aren't resizing the internal buffer continually. –  Servy Jul 27 '12 at 14:05
1  
@Aducci A list has an internal buffer that can hold up to N elements. When you add more elements and the buffer becomes to small, then a new buffer will be created, all elements copied over and the new buffer is used - this is a slow process. When you know the amount of elements you can tell the List "Hey, I want you to initially allocate enough memory to hold N elements", thus there won't be any new allocation necessary. –  Martin1921 Jul 27 '12 at 14:11
1  
It can be written slightly more tersely but in essence is exactly the same: var unpacked = new Tuple<List<int>, List<string>>(new List<int>(pairs.Count), new List<string>(pairs.Count)); pairs.ForEach(pair => { unpacked.Item1.Add(pair.Item1); unpacked.Item2.Add(pair.Item2); }); –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 27 '12 at 14:12
3  
@TimSchmelter That way you'd have to enumerate the list twice again, which I wanted to prevent. –  Martin1921 Jul 27 '12 at 14:14
Tuple<List<A>, List<B>> Unpack<A, B>(List<Tuple<A, B>> list) {
            return Tuple.Create(list.Select(e => e.Item1).ToList(),list.Select(e => e.Item2).ToList());
}
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public Tuple<List<int>,List<int>> Convert(List<Tuple<int, int>> BaseList)
{
    return new Tuple<List<int>,List<int>>((from tuple in BaseList
                                                        select tuple.Item1).ToList(),
                                                        (from tuple in BaseList
                                                        select tuple.Item2).ToList());
}

I considered it is a list of integer

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Should be generic, not using ints... –  Servy Jul 27 '12 at 14:13
    
then he can just replace int with object –  Youssef Jul 27 '12 at 14:22
3  
No, he shouldn't. The method should be generic, so that it's still strongly typed but can use any arbitrary type. –  Servy Jul 27 '12 at 14:26

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