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I have a file with several lines, each containing some 30,000 integers. I'm interested in computing various statistical quantities such as mean/media/variance/etc., per line.

For example, given a file whose contents are

1 2 3 4 5
6 8 9 0 10 11 12

I would like an output similar to

(std = 1.4142135623730951, mean = 3.0, median = 3.0)
(std = 3.7416573867739413, mean = 8.0, median = 9.0)    

What are my options apart from writing the thing myself (acquiring Happiness Through Numerics) ? Are there any one-liners for this?

A bash/python/perl/etc. solution is preferred, as is simplicity.

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4  
Do you have numpy? If so, it should be pretty easy ... –  mgilson Jul 27 '12 at 14:00
2  
@simbabque Have a look at my questions without an accept; what would you accept if you were me? –  user1071136 Jul 27 '12 at 14:02
    
Sorry, I just looked at how many questions there are, not at the number of replies. –  simbabque Jul 27 '12 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Not quite a 1-liner, but quite simple (provided you've installed numpy).

import numpy as np
with open(filename) as f:
    for line in f:
        a=np.array(line.split(),dtype=int)
        print(a.std(),a.mean(),np.median(a))  #standard-deviation, mean, median
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1  
Brilliant. 5-liner is the same as 1-liner. –  user1071136 Jul 27 '12 at 14:32
    
It's a 6 liner if you want to get the input filename from the commandline as then you need to import sys ;) –  mgilson Jul 27 '12 at 14:33

If you install the Statistics::Basic module, it looks like this in Perl. Most of the command is the format string!

perl -MStatistics::Basic=:all -lane 'printf "(std = %.16f, mean = %.1f, median = %.1f)\n",stddev(@F),mean(@F),median(@F)' datafile

output

(std = 1.4142135623730951, mean = 3.0, median = 3.0)
(std = 3.7416573867739413, mean = 8.0, median = 9.0)
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I think this directly addresses your question in Perl. I think it is somewhat doubtful you'll get this down to a one-liner.

Here's an example using PDL:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Modern::Perl;
use PDL;

open my $FILE, '<', './numbers.txt';

my @numbers = <$FILE>;

foreach my $number_set ( @numbers ) {
    my $piddle = pdl $number_set;
    my ($mean,$prms,$median,$min,$max,$adev,$rms) = statsover $piddle;
    printf "(std = %f, mean = %3.1f, median = %3.1f)\n", $rms, $mean, $median;
}

Numbers.txt contains:

1 2 3 4 5
6 8 9 0 10 11 12

Edit

As a one-line shell command this looks like

perl -MPDL -lne 'printf "(std = %7\$.16f, mean = %1\$.1f, median = %3\$.1f)\n", statsover pdl $_' numbers.txt
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1  
I've added a one-line equivalent to your answer. By the way the standard deviation is $rms not $adev. I've fixed that too. Hope that's OK –  Borodin Jul 28 '12 at 5:21
    
@Borodin - That's totally fine, Thank you! –  Craig Treptow Aug 7 '12 at 12:36

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