Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to build a cache with Google Guava and want to do some calculation on the expired objects. A removalListener notifies me, if some object was removed.

How can I run the removalListener in a different thread than the main application or pass the expired object (in the simple example below, that would be the Integer 3) to a different thread that handles the calculation?

Edit: As the calculation is rather short, but happens often, I would rather not create a new thread each time (would be thousands of threads), but have one (or maybe two) who calculate all objects.

Simple example:

Cache<String, Integer> cache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder().maximumSize(100)
        .expireAfterAccess(100, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
        .removalListener(new RemovalListener<String, Integer>() {
            public void onRemoval(final RemovalNotification notification) {
                if (notification.getCause() == RemovalCause.EXPIRED) {
                    System.out.println("removed " + notification.getValue());
                    // do calculation=> this should be in another thread
                }
            }
        })
        .build();
 cache.put("test1", 3);
 cache.cleanUp();
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

To run your listener in an executor, wrap it with RemovalListeners.asynchronous.

.removalListener(asynchronous(new RemovalListener() { ... }, executor))

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice one. very elegant and belongs to the library in question. "Just add water" (or an executor service) –  maasg Jul 27 '12 at 15:03
    
+1. Didn't know about this one. It eliminates the boilerplate code of creating Runnable instances. If only some removals must be done in a separate thread (and not just the ones caused by expiration), it doesn't work, though. –  JB Nizet Jul 27 '12 at 17:28

Create an ExecutorService using one of the Executors factory methods, and submit a new Runnable to this executor each time you need to:

private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

...

public void onRemoval(final RemovalNotification notification) {
    if (notification.getCause() == RemovalCause.EXPIRED) {
        System.out.println("removed " + notification.getValue());
        submitCalculation(notification.getValue());
    }
}

private void submitCalculation(final Integer value) {
    Runnable task = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // call your calculation here
        }
    };
    executor.submit(task);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi JB, I know you can pass arguments to new threads. But how about having just one or two who do all the work? If I create one anew each time, I would soon have thousands of them. –  Cassandra Jul 27 '12 at 14:19
    
That's precisely what the above is doing. It uses a single background thread (hence the name newSingleThreadExecutor()) to execute all submitted tasks. Don't confuse threads and Runnables. A Runnable is just a piece of executable code. A thread can execute several such pieces of code. –  JB Nizet Jul 27 '12 at 14:31
    
Ah, ok. Sorry, plain stupid from my part. –  Cassandra Jul 27 '12 at 14:54

You can create a new class, and implement the java.utils.Runnable interface like so;

public class MyWorkerThread implements Runnable {

    public MyWorkerThread(/*params*/) {
        //set your instance variables here
        //then start the thread
        (new Thread(this)).start();
    }

    public void run() {
        //do useful things
    }
}

When you create a new MyWorkerThread by calling the constructor, execution is returned to the calling code as soon as the constructor is finished, and a separate thread is started that runs the code inside the run() method.

If you might want to create MyWorkerThread objects without immediately starting them off, you can remove the Thread.start() code from the constructor, and call the thread manually from the instance later like so;

MyWorkerThread t = new MyWorkerThread();
//later
(new Thread(t)).start();

Or if you want to keep a reference to the Thread object so you can do groovy things like interrupt and join, do it like so;

Thread myThread = new Thread(t);
myThread.start();
//some other time
myThread.interrupt();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Or add a task to an ExecutorService –  Peter Lawrey Jul 27 '12 at 14:04

you can simply create intermediate queue for expired entities (expiration listener will just add expired object to this queue) - say some sort of blocking in-memory queue - ArrayBlockingQueue, LinkedBlockingDeque.

Then you can setup thread-pool and handlers(with configurable size) that will consume objects using poll() method.

For high-performance queue - i can advice more advanced non-blocking queue implementation if needed. also you can read more about high-performance non-blocking queues here Add the first element to a ConcurrentLinkedQueue atomically

share|improve this answer
    
Great idea. If you could advice some non-blocking queues, that would be helpful. Although I suspect I have to do a lot more research to understand the concepts of the implementation in actor implementations –  Cassandra Jul 27 '12 at 14:44
    
for non-blocking queue in general - please take a look here raw.github.com/gist/3181092/… for details. –  Andrey Borisov Jul 27 '12 at 14:47

Use an executor service to dispatch your task to a different thread. ExecutorService have an internal blocking queue that is used for safe publishing of references between the producer and the consumer threads. The factory class Executors can be used to create different ExecutorService with different thread management strategies.

private ExecutorService cleanupExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(CLEANUP_THREADPOOL_SIZE); 
...
public void onRemoval(final RemovalNotification notification) {
    if (notification.getCause() == RemovalCause.EXPIRED) {
        System.out.println("removed " + notification.getValue());
        doAsyncCalculation(notification.getValue());
    }
}

private void doAsyncCalculation(final Object obj) {
    cleanupExecutor.submit(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            expensiveOperation(obj);
        }
    }
}

In doAsyncCalculation you are creating new tasks to be run but not new threads. The executor service takes care of dispatching the task to the threads in the executorService's associated thread pool.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.