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I have a "button" that I wish to use all throughout my site, but depending on where in the site the button is, I want it to display at different sizes.

In my HTML I have tried (but its not working):

<div class="button" width="60" height="100">This is a button</div>

And the matching CSS:

.button {
background-color: #000000;
color: #FFFFFF;
float: right;
padding: 10px;
border-radius: 10px;
-moz-border-radius: 10px;
-webkit-border-radius: 10px;

}

My thinking was that if each time I call this class I can just pass in a size and hey-presto!....but not....

By adding the width and height as I call the button class seems to do nothing to the size of it. Does anyone know how I can do this? And if I put the width and height in the CSS then the button will be the same size everywhere.

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why are u using inline width & height attribute if u want to display in different width –  SVS Jul 27 '12 at 14:06
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should not use "width" and "height" attributes directly, use style="some css here" if you want to use inline styling:

<div class="button" style="width:60px;height:30px;">This is a button</div>

Note, however, that inline styling should generally be avoided since it makes maintenance and style updates a nightmare. Personally, if I had a button styling like yours but also wanted to apply different sizes, I would work with multiple css classes for sizing, like this:

HTML

<div class="button big-btn">This is a big button</div>
<div class="button medium-btn">This is a medium button</div>
<div class="button snall-btn">This is a small button</div>

CSS

.button {
    background-color: #000000;
    color: #FFFFFF;
    float: right;
    padding: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
}

.small-btn {
    width: 50px;
    height: 20px;
}

.medium-btn {
    width: 70px;
    height: 30px;
}

.big-btn {
    width: 90px;
    height: 40px;
}

jsFiddle example

Using this way of defining styles removes all style information from your HTML markup, which in will make it easier down the road if you want to change the size of all small buttons - you'll only have to change them once in the CSS.

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1  
Combining these classes in the CSS file is not necessary, and in fact it is better if you don't. If, for instance, you not only had .button, but also .submit, or .purchase that were buttons, you could then apply .medium-btn to each of them without duplicating code. –  Ryan Kinal Jul 27 '12 at 14:20
    
Also, +1 for a well-written answer –  Ryan Kinal Jul 27 '12 at 14:20
    
That's a good point - I tend to be a bit verbose with CSS at times. To some extent it depends on how you plan to use it, but in general - and in this case - I think your point applies. –  Anders Holmström Jul 27 '12 at 14:22
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If you want to call a different size for the button inline, you would probably do it like this:

<div class="button" style="width:60px;height:100px;">This is a button</div>

Or, a better way to have different sizes (say there will be 3 standard sizes for the button) would be to have classes just for size.

For example, you would call your button like this:

<div class="button small">This is a button</div>

And in your CSS

.button.small { width: 60px; height: 100px; }

and just create classes for each size you wish to have. That way you still have the perks of using a stylesheet in case say, you want to change the size of all the small buttons at once.

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1  
+1 for the second option. Separating your styles and making them consistent across the site is good. However, I'd probably make your "size" class .button-small, and your HTML attribute class="button button-small". .small is a little too generic. Your "subclasses" should have some connection to your "superclasses". –  Ryan Kinal Jul 27 '12 at 14:12
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USe inline styles:

<div class="button" style="width:60px;height:100px;">This is a button</div>

Fiddle

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This method works especially well since inline styles override styles defined in CSS. –  Derreck Dean Jul 27 '12 at 14:07
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Another alternative is that you are allowed to have multiple classes in a tag. Consider:

 <div class="button big">This is a big button</div>
 <div class="button small">This is a small button</div>

And the CSS:

 .button {
     /* all your common button styles */
 }

 .big {
     height: 60px;
     width: 100px;
 }
 .small {
     height: 40px;
     width: 70px;
 }

and so on.

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See my comment on this answer for proper use. –  Ryan Kinal Jul 27 '12 at 14:13
    
Wow. Three nearly identical answers posted while I was typing this one. How's that for independent verification? –  cobaltduck Jul 27 '12 at 14:14
    
And here I was thinking you were all just copying me.. ;) But yes - it's good to see that we all agree on this! –  Anders Holmström Jul 27 '12 at 14:41
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