Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to check if any object is missing in complex object chain. I've come up with following solution, is there a better way accomplish the same?

var lg = console.log;
var t = { a:{a1: 33, a12:{ aa1d: 444, cc:3 } }, b:00};
var isDefined = function(topObj, propertyPath) {
    if (typeof topObj !== 'object') {
        throw new Error('First argument must be of type \'object\'!');
    }
    if (typeof propertyPath === 'string') {
        throw new Error('Second argument must be of type \'string\'!');
    }
    var props = propertyPath.split('.');
    for(var i=0; i< props.length; i++) {
        var prp = props[i];
        lg('checking property: ' + prp); 
        if (typeof topObj[prp] === 'undefined') {
            lg(prp + ' undefined!');
            return false;
        } else {
           topObj = topObj[prp];
        }        
    }
    return true;
}
isDefined(t, 'a.a12.cc');
share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of javascript test for existence of nested object key –  Felix Kling Jul 27 '12 at 14:32
    
@Felix The question is not a duplicate. The duplicate does not account for inherit properties from the prototype chain. –  Rob W Jul 27 '12 at 14:51
    
@RobW: This was not asked for and is easy to change. The overall approach does not change. –  Felix Kling Jul 27 '12 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your concept is OK, but the code has to be changed. When a property has the null value, it can't have any properties. Trying to access a property on null results in an error. To fix this, use:

for (var i=0; i<props.length; i++) {
    var prp = props[i],
        val = topObj[prp];
    lg('checking property: ' + prp); 
    if (typeof val === 'undefined') {
        lg(prp + ' undefined!');
        return false;
    } else if (val === null) {
        return i === props.length-1; // True if last, false otherwise
    } else {
        topObj = val;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
great catch, thanks –  krul Jul 27 '12 at 14:39
1  
@krul Another catch: Don't use var lg = console.log; This breaks in Chrome. Use var lg = console.log.bind(console); instead, which preserves the context of console.log. –  Rob W Jul 27 '12 at 14:59
    
Rob W, thanks, I know that but didn't pay attention, thanks anyway. –  krul Jul 27 '12 at 15:38

You could define your function more simply like this:

var isDefined = function(value, path) {
  path.split('.').forEach(function(key) { value = value && value[key]; });
  return (typeof value != 'undefined' && value !== null);
};

Working example on jsfiddle.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.