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My problem is similar problem to shell script: search and replace over multiple lines with a small exception.

In the question linked the user wants to do this:

source:
[stuff before]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->
  [stuff here, possibly multiple lines.
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->
[stuff after]    

target:
[stuff before]
[new content]
[stuff after]

My problem is similar, I want to do this:

source:
[stuff before]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->
  [this]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->
  [not this]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->
[stuff after]    

target:
[stuff before]
[new content]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->
  [not this]
<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->
[stuff after]

In a proper multiline regex this is easy to do:

/<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->.*[this].*<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->/m

but the answer suggested in the linked question uses regex as ranges which doesn't allow checking lines between the two outlying bounds.

Is there any way to add all the lines in a range to the pattern buffer so I can regex over all the lines at once? eg:

sed '
    #range between comment beginning and comment end
    /<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->/,/<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->/
    #Do something to add the lines in this range to pattern buffer
    /.*[this].*/d
    #Delete all the lines if [this] is in the pattern buffer
' <in.txt >out.txt
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Your "easy" regex probably doesn't do what you'd expect: it probably finds a region starting at the first begin comment and ending at the third end comment. –  ams Jul 27 '12 at 15:35
    
have anything constructive to say? maybe tell me why that might not do what I think? –  Michael Allen Jul 27 '12 at 15:46
    
I did have a solution half worked out, but solving my own problems got in the way. ;) The reason is that both regex and regions are greedy: they always match the longest pattern possible, even if that means skipping over an 'end' pattern to get there. –  ams Jul 30 '12 at 7:57
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

With Perl, it's relatively simple.

perl -0777pe 's/<!--BEGIN-->\n(?:(?!<!--END-->\n).)*?\[this\].*?\n<!--END-->\n/[new content]\n/s' in.txt

The benefits offered by Perl are (a) the -0777 "slurp mode" which pulls in the entire input file in one go, instead of sed's line-at-a-time processing; (b) the /s regex flag which allows for dot to match a newline; (c) the stingy repetition operators *? and friends, which causes the repetition to match as little as possible instead of as much as possible; and finally (d) the negative lookahead (?!...) which allows you to inhibit matching where the negative lookahead expression matches. (Without this, even stingy matching would match across an end delimiter if there was a "false" starting delimiter in the "stuff before" text.) ... And of course, (e) a general-purpose programming language where sed is only suitable for relatively simple text processing tasks.

(I used simpler beginning and ending delimiters. I hope "wierd" was an intentional misspelling.)

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Disclaimer: I am a beginner. This surely is not be the best way to do it.


I've done something similar in three steps. Assuming you're running on Linux, you can do the following:

1) Replace all occurences of a newline in your file with a special character:

cat originalText.txt | tr '\n' '~' > temp

2) Perform your regex using your favorite method (I used perl) placing an instance of the special character at each position you expect a newline. Make sure to keep the special newline character intact.

3) Do the first command the other way around this time:

cat temp | tr '~' '\n' > modText.txt

I hope this helps.

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an option, but too likely to fail. The file this is working on is a generated file. Too likely that instances of the char I choose will be replaced at the end with \n when they shouldn't have been –  Michael Allen Jul 27 '12 at 15:58
    
Hm... What about using an exotic character as a replacement? I mean ascii has a lot of alternative characters that are not likely to appear in a generated file. (Unless of course it has binary sections) Edit: I tried it with invisible characters such as '/30' and I didn't encounter any errors of loss. Edit 2: Regex supports non-printable characters, specifically ascii control characters using \cA through \cZ. Maybe try those. –  Oday Mansour Jul 27 '12 at 16:03
    
Check this out regular-expressions.info/characters.html#nonprint –  Oday Mansour Jul 27 '12 at 16:08
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Is there any way to add all the lines in a range to the pattern buffer so I can regex over all the lines at once?

Sure, use the hold space. For example:

sed -n '/begin/,/end/{ /begin/{h;d};H}; /end/{g;s/\n/<newline>/gp}'

will replace newlines between lines matching 'begin' and 'end' with the text <newline>

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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed ':a;$!N;/^<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->/!{P;D};/<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->$/!ba;s/\[this\]/[new content]/;p;d' file
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I claimed that this is difficult in sed, but after increasing my sed-fu, it seems it isn't so hard:

sed -r -n '
  /<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_BEGIN-->/ {
    x                 # |
    d                 # > Empty hold space
    x                 # |
  }
  H                   # Append to hold space
  /<!--WIERD_SPECIAL_COMMENT_END-->/ {
    x                 # Exchange hold- and pattern space
    /\[not this\]/p   # Only print if [not this] is found
  }
' infile
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, tried that. Only deletes the line with [this] on it. Also tried /.*[this].*/d same thing. Seems the regex delete gets executed for each individual line inside the range –  Michael Allen Jul 27 '12 at 15:56
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