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class A
{
public:
    A(...) {...}
    virtual ~A() {...}

private:
    // may contains data
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(...) {...}
private:
    // contains no data
};

class C : public B
{
public:
    C(...) {...}
    ~C() {...}
private:
    // may contains data
};

As you can see, class A is the base class so we have to provide a implemented virtual destructor.

Question> Do we have to provide a default destructor for a concrete class B? class B itself doesn't require to implement a customized destructor to release any allocated resource.

Thank you

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No. <extra characters to make limit> –  Matt Phillips Jul 27 '12 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. Once one base destructor is virtual, all derived destructors are automatically virtual. If the default implementation suffices, you do not need to provide a user-defined destructor.

(In fact, if the default implementation suffices even in the base, you should declare and define it as virtual ~A() = default;, rather than with an empty body.)

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good! C++11 syntax! –  q0987 Jul 27 '12 at 14:47

No, you don't have to that in case you don't have resources to release.

The same is applied to any other methods including virtual and pure virtual

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